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View Full Version : Caminiti- changes his tune


Paulwny
05-31-2002, 08:02 AM
He says he lied about the number of steroid users.

http://www.newsday.com/sports/baseball/ny-steroids312726972may31.story?coll=ny%2Dbaseball%2D headlines

PaleHoseGeorge
05-31-2002, 09:15 AM
Originally posted by Paulwny
He says he lied about the number of steroid users.

http://www.newsday.com/sports/baseball/ny-steroids312726972may31.story?coll=ny%2Dbaseball%2D headlines

What a gutless piece of s***. I wish I could say he was the exception amongst professional athletes, but then I would be lying just like this turd.

Oh sure, we should let these guys decide what's okay to put in their body. Them and the heroin addicts, too.

Joe Torre had the best quote about steroids. He admitted he had only ever heard rumors about steroid use--the standard b.s. excuse. But Torre is a smart guy and volunteered something nobody else did. He went on to say, "I remember back when I played, there were times when you would have done practically anything to get an extra hit."

Bingo! That, in a nutshell, is why MLB must ban steroids and routinely test the players.

If that means a "cops and robbers" chase of the bad guys, good! Let them try and get away with it. Gaylord Perry got away with throwing a spitter, and that made him colorful. Get caught taking steroids, you'll be unmercifully ostracized--and rightfully so. Ask Ben Johnson.

Take your chances, you punks!

Paulwny
05-31-2002, 09:46 AM
From an AP article "See No Evil, Hear No Evil" :

Before the strike-shortened 1994 season, there was only one season in baseball history where the average number of home runs per game was 2 or higher. Every season since 1994 has averaged 2 or more.

If you think this is not a coincidence, you are not alone. More than a few people believe the suits running baseball figured that if one Mark McGwire-Sammy Sosa duel sold tickets, then dozens of them will sell more.

And so most of the new ballparks have at least one very short home-run porch, as well as NASA-quality video machines, batting cages and weight rooms. Strike zones have shrunk and expansion has diluted the pitching. Bats are now made to a hardness that just a few years ago was unthinkable.

But all of those factors combined don't add up to the quantum leap in power. You have to look at the players to bridge that gap. They went along voluntarily because their bank accounts swelled even faster than their biceps.

There was a brief fuss after Mark McGwire acknowledged using androstenedione in an Associated Press story during his record-breaking 1998 season.

The commissioner got around to commissioning a study of andro. Two years later, a team of Harvard scientists concluded it raised testosterone levels - probably translating into bigger muscles and more strength - and could be hazardous to a ballplayer's health.

Selig thanked the researchers for a "significant contribution to the science surrounding its use" and put the study in a drawer. He and union boss Donald Fehr - who can't agree on whether the sun is shining - both said more research is needed.
The owners and players still don't have a labor agreement, and both sides will probably use the steroid issue as a bargaining chip.

Just what baseball needed.

PaleHoseGeorge
06-01-2002, 04:01 AM
I split this topic back to the original discussion: Caminiti recanting his earlier statements about wide-spread steroid usage in baseball.

He's still a spineless jerk.

And now we know he's a lying spineless jerk, too. :smile:

bjmarte
06-01-2002, 04:15 AM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
I split this topic back to the original discussion: Caminiti recanting his earlier statements about wide-spread steroid usage in baseball.

He's still a spineless jerk.

And now we know he's a lying spineless jerk, too. :smile:

That I agree with. :D:

Randar68
06-01-2002, 04:28 AM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
I split this topic back to the original discussion: Caminiti recanting his earlier statements about wide-spread steroid usage in baseball.

He's still a spineless jerk.

And now we know he's a lying spineless jerk, too. :smile:

He wasn't lying the first time, but with him thinking about a comeback and having just alienated all the people in his peer group whom he really cares about, I'm sure he doesn't care what any of us or the media thinks, just his fellow players.

Ken isn't the first guy to paint this dark of a picture, Rob Dibble, Schilling, and several others have all been quoted at various times giving numbers at least AT 50% or higher.

This topic should have been raised as soon as Mark and others showed up for the 1996 season looking huge and it just grew from there.

Spiff
06-01-2002, 04:41 AM
"What's really bothering me most about this whole thing is how it got blown out of context," the former NL MVP told ESPN Radio. "I don't know if I mentioned half or not. That is something that might have been thrown in my face or in my mouth. That's not true. That's a false statement. I didn't mean half. There's a couple of people that have done it that I know of. Baseball's a pretty clean sport."

"They came to me wanting to talk about life after baseball and then it turned into this whole steroid thing," Caminiti said. "I never knew the interview was going to go like that. It just got real ugly. When I said 'half,' I lied. I can honestly say that. I didn't mean to say that."

I am no Caminiti apologist, but there is rampant sensationalism going on everywhere. It started with SI and now it's all over the papers and these boards and now ESPN won't shut up about it.

I would tend to believe Caminiti when he says his words were taken out of context. This is the third time in less than two years that a player has been bitter about an SI interview. There was Rocker (granted, he did say some bad stuff) being interviewed in his truck on the highway. Who here doesn't get pissed off on the highway? I can easily see throwing something out there without thinking about it first.

Then there was David Wells, who was upset that the same writer who did the Rocker story, Jeff Pearlman, did an interview with him and made the whole article about how fat and lazy he was.

Now this and Caminiti, and he did say 50% and that much he has admitted. But I believe him when he says it wasn't the point of the interview, or what the article was supposed to be about. This was a different writer (Verducci), but I am wary of what SI reports nowadays.

Randar68
06-01-2002, 04:55 AM
Originally posted by Spiff
Now this and Caminiti, and he did say 50% and that much he has admitted. But I believe him when he says it wasn't the point of the interview, or what the article was supposed to be about. This was a different writer (Verducci), but I am wary of what SI reports nowadays.

Does it matter if the interview was about anything else in Caminiti's opinion? He said what he said! SI is one of the few sports writing sources that has ANY credibility left. You should try to get a hold of a Tony Kornhieser(sp?) tape from today. These types of pieces are nto non-chalantly thrown around in a place as prestigious and respected as SI and writers such as David Verducci. I'm sure they had many cross-checkers verifying as much of this story as possible.

This isn't the NY Times. While Caminiti didn't have anything to gain by what he said, it was only in hindsight that he realized he had something to lose.

He said what he said. End of freakin story.

Spiff
06-01-2002, 04:59 AM
Originally posted by Randar68


Does it matter if the interview was about anything else in Caminiti's opinion? He said what he said! SI is one of the few sports writing sources that has ANY credibility left. You should try to get a hold of a Tony Kornhieser(sp?) tape from today. These types of pieces are nto non-chalantly thrown around in a place as prestigious and respected as SI and writers such as David Verducci. I'm sure they had many cross-checkers verifying as much of this story as possible.

This isn't the NY Times. While Caminiti didn't have anything to gain by what he said, it was only in hindsight that he realized he had something to lose.

He said what he said. End of freakin story.

He said what he said, but SI has a way of slanting things. They make it sound like he came running to them with this. Like I said, it's sensationalism. How long have we known players take steroids? If you never thought it came into play, well then maybe this is a big revelation for you (not necessarily you, but anyone in general).

And his name is Tom Verducci. :D:

Randar68
06-01-2002, 05:09 AM
Originally posted by Spiff


He said what he said, but SI has a way of slanting things. They make it sound like he came running to them with this. Like I said, it's sensationalism. How long have we known players take steroids? If you never thought it came into play, well then maybe this is a big revelation for you (not necessarily you, but anyone in general).

And his name is Tom Verducci. :D:

Sorry about the name. But, did you even read the article? The Caminiti part was only a small part of the whole story.

How do law enforcement officials get the info they want? They ask the same questions worded slightly differently and try to make the parts they want to know about seem less important. Guess what, it works. Someone needed to do a story like this and raise the public's awareness on the issue. It has not been foreign to many "in the know", but there should be the associated outrage and what these players are doing. It is ruining the integrity of the game even further. The players can't control what Bud Selig does, but they can control the honor part of it.

It's a bunch of clowns like Sosa and BigMac who have helped to ruin the traditional game of baseball over the last 6 or so years.