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View Full Version : Not a good week for baseball: Mark "The Bird" Fidrych dead.


downstairs
04-13-2009, 05:45 PM
http://www.myfoxboston.com/dpp/news/local/041309_Mark_Fidrych_dies_at_Mass_home

Fenway
04-13-2009, 05:46 PM
WCVB Boston is reporting the death of Mark Fidrych How sad

SoxGirl4Life
04-13-2009, 05:55 PM
http://msn.foxsports.com/mlb/story/9452168/Former-MLB-pitcher-Fidrych-dead-at-54

Soxman219
04-13-2009, 06:02 PM
Man *** is going on. Everyone is dying. Sad.

PKalltheway
04-13-2009, 06:03 PM
Man, what a sad day. First Harry Kalas, now this. RIP.:(:
http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=4065778

Dickie Kerr
04-13-2009, 06:03 PM
I can't remember a worse baseball week in recent memory. First Nick Adelman, than Harry Kalas, now the Bird? Wow.

jamokes
04-13-2009, 06:04 PM
I feel for all Tiger fans with ths one, way too young to die.

DumpJerry
04-13-2009, 06:04 PM
Rip.:(:

JB98
04-13-2009, 06:12 PM
Wow. That's a shock. Fidrych is definitely one of the most famous one-year wonders in MLB history.

It's been a sad week for baseball, with the deaths of Adenhart, Kalas and Fidrych.

chisox77
04-13-2009, 06:25 PM
I remember that 1976 season so well when "The Bird" was huge. Way too young to depart. God bless him, and much sympathy to Tiger fans.

jackbrohamer
04-13-2009, 06:39 PM
A lot of people have played major league baseball, but Mark Fidrych was absolutely unique among them. He always seemed like a great guy, it's sad to see him go so soon.

Woofer
04-13-2009, 06:56 PM
Man, that is too bad. He was really something in 76, too bad his career was so short.

FloridaTigers
04-13-2009, 07:06 PM
RIP. Horrible horrible.

His suburban Detroit apartment is austere by big league standards. He doesn't even have a telephone. "Sometimes I get lazy and let the dishes stack up," he confessed. "But they don't stack too high. I've only got four dishes."

soxinem1
04-13-2009, 07:38 PM
Wow, not a good baseball week!! Per CBS and ESPN.

Sorry Mods, had a crash problem when I originally wrote this, just now refreshed.

Paulwny
04-13-2009, 07:47 PM
RIP
During your short mlb career, you were a breath of fresh air.

Frankfan4life
04-13-2009, 09:15 PM
Thanks for the memories Mark. It was fun watching him pitch. My condolences to his family, friends and many fans.

Oblong
04-13-2009, 10:24 PM
My first baseball memory is The Bird. A complete shocker. Stunned. Very sad.

The final game at Tiger Stadium. The game's over, they are starting a tribute. We don't know what they're going to do. We're in the stands just looking out. Sparky was too sick to travel and gives a little speech on the scoreboard but we can't hear it too well. Then there's just silence for about 30 seconds. Suddenly The Bird comes running out from CF in his uniform, hair flopping around, smiling, laughing. We knew it was him right away. He runs to the pitchers mound, gets on his hands and knees and starts scooping up the dirt. That set the tone for a beautiful night of old players coming out.

He'd do autograph shows here about once a year and they were always free or a nominal fee, like $3. I waited 3 hours once and there were still lots of people behind me. He'd sign them all and smile and take pictures with every one.

Such a joy. I'm grateful to say he was one of ours. He also belong to baseball as well because he was a great ambassador but I'm proud that he wore the D doing it.

Madscout
04-13-2009, 10:28 PM
Wow. I never saw him pitch, nor did I really know his contributions to baseball.

All I know of him is from what I asked my dad, because I played with my Dad's old baseball glove all through little league and babe ruth, and it was a Bird signature glove. Is it really true he used to talk to the ball and smooth out the mound with his hands?

Oblong
04-13-2009, 10:32 PM
Yes. He wasn't really a phenom initially. He just started doing that and winning. And he was genuine about it. He'd run over and shake all the infielders hands after an inning. Remember, in the 70s attendance wasn't like it was today. 20,000 was a lot of fans. Once he got going in 1976 there'd be sellouts whenever he pitched. At home and on the road. It was crazy. After the games the fans wouldn't leave until he came back out for a curtain call.

I'm certain ESPN Classic will be showing the Monday Night Baseball with the Yankees. That's really when the craze hit national.

And he was just a great personality. A fun loving 21 year old who captured the nation for a season.

TheMilkman
04-13-2009, 10:46 PM
Here's (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rm_jU0b5Hgw) a nice profile/interview of Fidrych from 1985 (hosted by Steve Stone)

michned
04-13-2009, 11:27 PM
Wow, what a horrible start to the season so far.

*Edit: Sorry, missed the other thread.

Link (http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20090413&content_id=4252328&vkey=news_mlb&fext=.jsp&c_id=mlb)

TommyJohn
04-13-2009, 11:37 PM
Yes. He wasn't really a phenom initially. He just started doing that and winning. And he was genuine about it. He'd run over and shake all the infielders hands after an inning. Remember, in the 70s attendance wasn't like it was today. 20,000 was a lot of fans. Once he got going in 1976 there'd be sellouts whenever he pitched. At home and on the road. It was crazy. After the games the fans wouldn't leave until he came back out for a curtain call.

I'm certain ESPN Classic will be showing the Monday Night Baseball with the Yankees. That's really when the craze hit national.

And he was just a great personality. A fun loving 21 year old who captured the nation for a season.

MLB Network showed it just this past Saturday.

ode to veeck
04-14-2009, 12:44 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090414/ap_on_sp_ba_ne/bba_obit_fidrych;_ylt=AhxJV65xLjSFJT.ejhSxcfs_z7QF

Nellie_Fox
04-14-2009, 01:25 AM
MLBNet just had an interview with him in the last couple of weeks. He seemed like he was still just a genuine, unassuming, nice guy. Somebody you'd like to have a few beers with.

FloridaTigers
04-14-2009, 01:37 AM
MLB Network showed it just this past Saturday.

I was watching that on Saturday. I stopped watching it after the third inning and went to sleep, as I've seen it many times in the last couple years on ESPN Classic/MLB Network. If I had known he'd die today, I wouldn've finished, just for the curtain call :(

Sox
04-14-2009, 02:05 AM
Another bit of sad news in the world of baseball. RIP Bird man.:(:

Fenway
04-14-2009, 09:03 AM
My first baseball memory is The Bird. A complete shocker. Stunned. Very sad.

The final game at Tiger Stadium. The game's over, they are starting a tribute. We don't know what they're going to do. We're in the stands just looking out. Sparky was too sick to travel and gives a little speech on the scoreboard but we can't hear it too well. Then there's just silence for about 30 seconds. Suddenly The Bird comes running out from CF in his uniform, hair flopping around, smiling, laughing. We knew it was him right away. He runs to the pitchers mound, gets on his hands and knees and starts scooping up the dirt. That set the tone for a beautiful night of old players coming out.

He'd do autograph shows here about once a year and they were always free or a nominal fee, like $3. I waited 3 hours once and there were still lots of people behind me. He'd sign them all and smile and take pictures with every one.

Such a joy. I'm grateful to say he was one of ours. He also belong to baseball as well because he was a great ambassador but I'm proud that he wore the D doing it.
Mark saved the AAA franchise in Pawtucket. The team was not drawing well and they were considering moving to Providence or Worcester. The Bird showed up in 1982 and everytime he pitched the Pawsox sold out and fans came to see how special McCoy Stadium was.He never got the chance to pitch for Boston as Ralph Houk simply didn't like him. Houk ruined him with the Tigers making him pitch back to back 11 inning starts and he blew his cuff.

Oblong
04-14-2009, 09:28 AM
I didn't realize this until today but even in June of 1977 he was 6 and 2 and had an ERA under 2.

There's always been issues regarding his injury, whether it was strictly an arm injury or a knee injury that led to a rotator problem by overcompensating for the knee. Some say he was goofing around in the OF and landed on his knee wrong.

Dave Rozema was on the radio this morning telling stories about "the good old days". Fidrcych was part of that young core of Tigers that became stars in the early and mid 80s. Rozema, Morris, Trammell, Parrish, etc. They all spent time together in the minors in the 70s. In 1977 Mark was in LA promoting something and Rozema and Parrish were out there because that's where Lance was living. Still minor leaguers. They showed up to the event in one of those 1970s vans, with the painted pictures on teh side, like Scooby Doo. He said "You gotta get me out of here." so they kidnapped him. Mark says "They will be looking for me. I'm due back soon." But they never went back.

Fidrych helped raise millions for the Special Olympics in Michigan. He did it without much fanfare, if any. The best thing about the Tigers playing the Sawx at Fenway was Mark would get in the booth for a few innings and tell stories in his thick accent.

My heart goes out to his wife, daughter Jessica, and his family and friends.

tick53
04-14-2009, 11:43 AM
Rest In Peace Bird. You were a colorful character who never failed to ammuse me.

Railsplitter
04-14-2009, 04:15 PM
I remeber teams the Tigers were playing on the road would promote Fidrych when Detroit came to town. A loss to the game when the injury bug came calling. :(: