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PushinWeight
09-23-2008, 10:40 AM
If a division winner plays a wild card team with a better record in the LCS, doesn't the division winner still get home field advantage? (Yeah, I know you probably figured out what scenario I'm thinking of)

skottyj242
09-23-2008, 10:44 AM
The Angels will probably end up with the best record in the AL so they will play the winner of the wild card. We will probably end up playing in Tampa Bay.

Chez
09-23-2008, 10:48 AM
A wildcard team cannot have home field advantage until the World Series regardless of whether it finished the season with a better record than a division winner.

oeo
09-23-2008, 10:50 AM
The Angels will probably end up with the best record in the AL so they will play the winner of the wild card. We will probably end up playing in Tampa Bay.

The Angels will play the winner of the Wild Card, regardless. The Sox can't catch them, and the Red Sox/Rays cannot play each other in the ALDS.

Mohoney
09-23-2008, 11:48 AM
What the original poster is asking is if the White and Red Sox both win in the first round, who gets home field in the ALCS?

doublem23
09-23-2008, 11:50 AM
What the original poster is asking is if the White and Red Sox both win in the first round, who gets home field in the ALCS?

If the Red Sox win the Wild Card and the Sox win the Central, the White Sox will have homefield in the ALCS. If the Red Sox win the East, they will likely have home field in the ALCS, since they will probably finish with a better record than the White Sox.

TDog
09-23-2008, 02:06 PM
What the original poster is asking is if the White and Red Sox both win in the first round, who gets home field in the ALCS?

Of course, as it appears to unfold, if the White Sox beat the Ray in the ALDS and the Red Sox beat the Angels in the ALDS, the White Sox would have homefield advantage for the ALCS against the Red Sox. In 2000, the White Sox played the wild card Mariners, which had a better record than the Eastern Division winning Yankees. The White Sox would have had homefield advantage over either the Yankees or the A's had they advanced, but because the Mariners beat the White Sox, the Yankees, the only team in the 2000 postseason with fewer than 90 wins, got the homefield advantage.

Similarly, the Marlins in 2003 couldn't have the homefield advantage when they faced the Cubs, the only NL postseason team with fewer than 90 wins. Unfortunately, the Marlins fell three games to one in the NLCS, and after winning Game 5 had to face the impossible task of beating Prior and Wood in Wrigley Field.

Homefield is something to play for. But in the end, it comes down to winning baseball games.