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View Full Version : Hypothetical (Ken Griffey Jr.)


LJS1993
09-12-2008, 09:02 PM
I pose this question to you guys. If you were Ken Griffey Jr and wanted to continue playing into your early 40's, what would you do? Yes, I know I might get some smart remarks, but nonetheless an interesting hypothetical. How would you go about resurrecting your career and giving yourself that last push needed to continue into your early 40's? Would you hit the weights hard? Would you shed some pounds, get with a serious trainer, perhaps someone involved in mma? Would you focus on restoring yourself at a corner slot or even 1B? Again, this is all considering you as Ken Griffey wanted to truly play another five years or so.

Konerko05
09-12-2008, 09:11 PM
Steroids and speed.

Daver
09-12-2008, 09:37 PM
Spend the entire winter in a batting cage against left handed junkballers and optimize the best swing baseball has seen since Ted Williams swung a bat.

LJS1993
09-12-2008, 09:41 PM
Steroids and speed.

Okay, let me clarify. Legally, and without cheating like Bonds.

CashMan
09-12-2008, 09:49 PM
Okay, let me clarify. Legally, and without cheating like Bonds.


I don't know what you would do with a DH, who doesn't hit for power.

Frater Perdurabo
09-12-2008, 09:51 PM
Spend the entire winter in a batting cage against left handed junkballers and optimize the best swing baseball has seen since Ted Williams swung a bat.

Yeah, that and drop about 20 pounds by eating right and exercising.

LJS1993
09-12-2008, 10:32 PM
Good input guys. Being involved in grappling tournaments myself I've seen many men in their 30's and early 40's who are very competitive. Though it's a different skill set entirely, the overall physical training needed to compete at a solid level has to carry over to baseball. Though I dislike Bonds for his use of steroids, I do believe he knows how to train and what it takes to push a body in the late 30's to higher levels.
If I was Griffey I would get with a serious mma trainer, someone who possibly has worked with a Randy Couture or Dan Henderson. I would eat a solid and well disciplined diet. As for the skill set itself, I would truly hit the cage hard in addition with the video in order to truly analyze my stroke. It may sound lame, but it works. That being swinging a weight bat in a pool. That drill would definately restore some bat speed that was lost due to age.

slavko
09-12-2008, 10:36 PM
If he wants to keep playing baseball, he should learn to throw a knuckleball.

Nellie_Fox
09-13-2008, 12:41 AM
If I was Griffey I would get with a serious mma trainer, someone who possibly has worked with a Randy Couture or Dan Henderson.Yeah, because only an MMA trainer really understands what's needed in baseball, and only MMA has well-conditioned athletes. :rolleyes:

LJS1993
09-13-2008, 01:12 AM
Yeah, because only an MMA trainer really understands what's needed in baseball, and only MMA has well-conditioned athletes. :rolleyes:

No baseball has some very well conditioned athletes but anyone who's done mma type training and played baseball would admit that the training involved in mma/grappling comp is much harsher then baseball. In fact, many football players, players such as Lorenzo Neal, have utlized mixed martial art/grappling training in their off season training due to it's diverse and much more intensive qualities.

Nellie_Fox
09-13-2008, 01:56 AM
No baseball has some very well conditioned athletes but anyone who's done mma type training and played baseball would admit that the training involved in mma/grappling comp is much harsher then baseball. In fact, many football players, players such as Lorenzo Neal, have utlized mixed martial art/grappling training in their off season training due to it's diverse and much more intensive qualities.My point is that MMA and baseball are nothing alike. How does "grappling" improve Griffey's ability to play baseball? How does "harsher" equal "better?" Navy Seal or Army Ranger training is harsh as hell, but it won't make you a better baseball player.

You are obviously enthralled with MMA. However, proper physical training can and should be sport-specific. Whether or not a couple of football players have done MMA training has absolutely not a damned thing to do with baseball.

fozzy
09-13-2008, 03:57 AM
i don't think mma training is the way to go it builds quick twitch muscles i.e. read and react. i think a focus on yoga and pilates that builds on flexability and strength is the way to go.

jabrch
09-13-2008, 04:14 AM
Yeah, that and drop about 20 pounds by eating right and exercising.

Are you assuming he eats poorly and doesn't exercise? What is it that you know to draw that conclusion?

He looks much like his dad did at this age.

Frater Perdurabo
09-13-2008, 05:50 AM
Are you assuming he eats poorly and doesn't exercise? What is it that you know to draw that conclusion?

Did I say that? I didn't assume anything.

I'm 32. Already I can tell my metabolism is different than when I was 25.

In their late 30s, men's bodies want to store belly fat. It requires even more exercise and an even more disciplined diet just to keep yourself in shape, much less improve your conditioning and lower your body fat percentage.

I'm nearly certain that Griffey does eat well and gets plenty of exercise. But if he wants to drop 20 pounds, he would need to eat even better and get even more exercise/get more targeted with his training.

LJS1993
09-13-2008, 09:28 AM
My point is that MMA and baseball are nothing alike. How does "grappling" improve Griffey's ability to play baseball? How does "harsher" equal "better?" Navy Seal or Army Ranger training is harsh as hell, but it won't make you a better baseball player.

You are obviously enthralled with MMA. However, proper physical training can and should be sport-specific. Whether or not a couple of football players have done MMA training has absolutely not a damned thing to do with baseball.

Well, not necessarily. Many of the same conditioning drills grapplers and mixed martial arts competitors perform would definitely cross over to baseball. A strong core, legs, and flexibility are all needed to be a good grappler AND a good baseball player, especially a man in his late 30's. Did I ever say he would actually grapple? No, I said perform the same conditioning drills. :scratch:

LJS1993
09-13-2008, 09:31 AM
Are you assuming he eats poorly and doesn't exercise? What is it that you know to draw that conclusion?

He looks much like his dad did at this age.

Yes, he does look alot like his Ken Sr. I bet Griffey excercises and eats fairly well but as the poster above mentioned, when you hit your mid 30's you must re-invent your training in order to keep up with the young guys. I truly doubt Griffey has anyone pushing him in order to seek out some alternative training methods, much like Barry Bonds. Granted Bonds is a cheat and a fraud. But, take out the "clear", the HGH, and the testostacreme and he really did have a good plan going when it came to extending his career.

DumpJerry
09-13-2008, 09:40 AM
Yoga, Pilates and train with Dara Torres.

His other option is to hang out with me.:cool:

35th and Shields
09-13-2008, 01:56 PM
I don't know what you would do with a DH, who doesn't hit for power.

I hope this isn't serious

Nellie_Fox
09-13-2008, 04:36 PM
Well, not necessarily. Many of the same conditioning drills grapplers and mixed martial arts competitors perform would definitely cross over to baseball. A strong core, legs, and flexibility are all needed to be a good grappler AND a good baseball player, especially a man in his late 30's. Did I ever say he would actually grapple? No, I said perform the same conditioning drills. :scratch:You have missed my point entirely. To say the MMA training is the absolute best training there is, no matter the sport, is just ludicrous. Sport-specific training, with concentration on the particular weaknesses and needs of the individual athlete, is the way to go.

drewcifer
09-13-2008, 04:44 PM
You have missed my point entirely. To say the MMA training is the absolute best training there is, no matter the sport, is just ludicrous. Sport-specific training, with concentration on the particular weaknesses and needs of the individual athlete, is the way to go.

It's clear he wanted to talk about MMA training, grappling, whatever. This doesn't have anything to do with a 39 year old who used to be able to play the game well.

To answser your original question:

If you were Ken Griffey Jr and wanted to continue playing into your early 40's, what would you do?

Cheat or hire someone to build an anti-aging machine.

pistolesatdawn
09-13-2008, 06:09 PM
I'm sure all of the leg related injuries have certainly slowed him down over the years, but at the same time, it would seem losing some weight would definitely help him.

forrestg
09-13-2008, 06:51 PM
First he has to learn his limitations.. He can't rove centerfield.. He may be able to play first.. Any part of the outfield is too much.. Dropping 20lbs.. That is not going to do it try 30 or 40 if he is to compete.. I still see not reason why he can't play first.. Take less money in 2009.. Play for the fun of the game convince yourself that designated hitter might not be so bad.. Wait I still think you can play but you have to make compromises your bat speed isn't what it once was. So you need to get healthier, leaner and more flexible..

LJS1993
09-13-2008, 08:36 PM
I hope this isn't serious

Unfortunately it's probably another B.S. opinion that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

LJS1993
09-13-2008, 08:38 PM
It's clear he wanted to talk about MMA training, grappling, whatever. This doesn't have anything to do with a 39 year old who used to be able to play the game well.

To answser your original question:



Cheat or hire someone to build an anti-aging machine.

Actually, I just mentioned MMA because it dawned on me that many of the conditioning methods could really assist a ball player in his conditioning. But, since you experts have deemed those conditioning drills a waste of time for baseball players, I guess that answers it.

MISoxfan
09-13-2008, 10:40 PM
He needs to hire a top flight NBA trainer. It makes about as much sense.