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View Full Version : Don Gutteridge passed away


soxinem1
09-08-2008, 04:40 PM
Forever misaligned with the worst group of misfits in team history, the 1970 White Sox:

http://www.sportsline.com/mlb/story/10967539

jackbrohamer
09-08-2008, 04:49 PM
RIP Don Gutteridge, coach for the Pennant-Winning 1959 White Sox (he coached from 1955-66, and 1968-69). He was a great team player, taking over a truly brutal team when Al Lopez unexpectedly stepped down in 1969.

Amazing how long the coaching staff of the '59 Sox lived: Al Lopez lived to 97; Ray Berres almost to 100 and Don Gutteridge to 96.

LITTLE NELL
09-08-2008, 05:03 PM
RIP Don Gutteridge, coach for the Pennant-Winning 1959 White Sox (he coached from 1955-66, and 1968-69). He was a great team player, taking over a truly brutal team when Al Lopez unexpectedly stepped down in 1969.

Amazing how long the coaching staff of the '59 Sox lived: Al Lopez lived to 97; Ray Berres almost to 100 and Don Gutteridge to 96.
Tony Cuccinello, our 3B coach made it to 88 and John Cooney who was the bench coach was 85 when he passed on. Those 5 guys did something right.

Dan H
09-08-2008, 05:07 PM
Gutteridge was a good baseball man. Nobody could have done anything with the 1970 Sox. It's nice to see that he lived a long life.

TDog
09-08-2008, 06:26 PM
Gutteridge was a good baseball man. Nobody could have done anything with the 1970 Sox. It's nice to see that he lived a long life.

That was more or less the response attributed to him when he reportedly was surprised to be told he wouldn't be returning for the 1971 season.
A former, younger teammate of Leo Durocher who seemed to lack Durocher's energy while managing the losing team in Chicago (as opposed to the team that couldn't win).

Misfits is an apt description of the 1970 White Sox --two Gold Glove defenders at short and center, a former Gold Glove at second plus a great defensive catcher, and they still managed to have the worst defensive team in the league. So much for strength up the middle. The leftfielder had no thumb, the rightfielder had no neck and the centerfielder had no brain, Cubs fans (despite supposedly ignoring the White Sox) used to say. I don't know what they had against Ken Berry, though.

Bill Melton has said it was tough for Don Gutteridge to move from coach to manager, which required different relationships with the players. Before he became manager, he was more of the friend the players could go to. Then he became the boss.

I came of age as a Sox fan with Don Gutteridge as manager, before I realized any of this, although I recall Eddie Stanky and Al Lopez. The White Sox became fashionable again under Chuck Tanner, and he was the first manager I cared about while he was managing. But over the years, I've wondered if Gutteridge was still alive. There was something reassuring about the lack of a date of death on his Baseball Reference page.

This is sad news.

LITTLE NELL
09-08-2008, 06:39 PM
That was more or less the response attributed to him when he reportedly was surprised to be told he wouldn't be returning for the 1971 season.
A former, younger teammate of Leo Durocher who seemed to lack Durocher's energy while managing the losing team in Chicago (as opposed to the team that couldn't win).

Misfits is an apt description of the 1970 White Sox --two Gold Glove defenders at short and center, a former Gold Glove at second plus a great defensive catcher, and they still managed to have the worst defensive team in the league. So much for strength up the middle. The leftfielder had no thumb, the rightfielder had no neck and the centerfielder had no brain, Cubs fans (despite supposedly ignoring the White Sox) used to say. I don't know what they had against Ken Berry, though.

Bill Melton has said it was tough for Don Gutteridge to move from coach to manager, which required different relationships with the players. Before he became manager, he was more of the friend the players could go to. Then he became the boss.

I came of age as a Sox fan with Don Gutteridge as manager, before I realized any of this, although I recall Eddie Stanky and Al Lopez. The White Sox became fashionable again under Chuck Tanner, and he was the first manager I cared about while he was managing. But over the years, I've wondered if Gutteridge was still alive. There was something reassuring about the lack of a date of death on his Baseball Reference page.

This is sad news.
I'm curious why you say Kenny Berry had no brain.

TDog
09-08-2008, 06:45 PM
I'm curious why you say Kenny Berry had no brain.

Cubs fans used to say that, and as I said in my post, I don't know what they had against Ken Berry. The only thing I can figure is that he ran into walls to make catches.

LITTLE NELL
09-08-2008, 06:54 PM
Cubs fans used to say that, and as I said in my post, I don't know what they had against Ken Berry. The only thing I can figure is that he ran into walls to make catches.
After Landis he was the best in CF for the Sox. The Cub fans were just jealous that they did not have a good CF back then, especially in 69 when they had the infamous Don Young, the guy that Santo ran out of town.
Sorry i misunderstood you.

Medford Bobby
09-08-2008, 07:31 PM
Last guy alive from the Cardinal's Gas House Gang. I watched him a couple years back on NESN throwing out a first pitch with other members of the 1946 Red Sox during an Opening Day ceremony. He looked good.

I wish Lip Man would have has an opportunity to interview this baseball vet.

hula
09-08-2008, 07:44 PM
[quote=TDog;2031686] the rightfielder had no neck

I came of age as a Sox fan with Don Gutteridge as manager.
quote]

You must be referring to Walt Williams!! Didn't you love to see his stance at the plate?!!

No matter how scrappy that team was, since they were pretty much my first introduction to a live game, there was something very fun about watching them!

RIP Don....I could always tell you loved the game....

LITTLE NELL
09-08-2008, 07:53 PM
[quote=TDog;2031686] the rightfielder had no neck

I came of age as a Sox fan with Don Gutteridge as manager.
quote]

You must be referring to Walt Williams!! Didn't you love to see his stance at the plate?!!

No matter how scrappy that team was, since they were pretty much my first introduction to a live game, there was something very fun about watching them!

RIP Don....I could always tell you loved the game....
I did not have a lot of fun watching the 70 Sox. Ashamed to say this, but 1970 was the only year I did not make it to the ballpark except the year I was in Viet Nam. 70 was so bad that when we had a 23 game improvement in 71 it felt like we won a pennant.

2906
09-08-2008, 08:01 PM
[quote=hula;2031742]
I did not have a lot of fun watching the 70 Sox. Ashamed to say this, but 1970 was the only year I did not make it to the ballpark except the year I was in Viet Nam. 70 was so bad that when we had a 23 game improvement in 71 it felt like we won a pennant.

I won some free tickets to a twi night doubleheader in late August as I recall. My dad said we'd sit through one game but not two. There were about 1000 people there, if that.

Very interesting to read Don Gutteridge's career history. I did not know he played on the '44 St. Louis Browns and was the last living member of the team.

Noneck
09-08-2008, 08:15 PM
You must be referring to Walt Williams!! Didn't you love to see his stance at the plate?!!




You can guess I do. Remember when he came back to the Sox from a stint in the pacific coast league and was batting with with his hands separated? And he had some power like this, amazing.

TornLabrum
09-08-2008, 08:31 PM
Don Gutteridge was the author of two of my favorite baseball quotes.

Rich Lindberg attributed this to him as he watched Walt Williams shagging fly balls during spring training: "He makes the hard ones look hard."

But my all time favorite was his all too realistic comment on the prospects of the Sox' 1970 starting rotation: "Remember Spahn and Sain and pray for rain? With us it will be Horlen and John and then we get bombed."

Rest in peace, Don.

all*star quentin
09-08-2008, 09:27 PM
RIP Mr. Gutteridge

comet2k
09-09-2008, 08:02 AM
That was more or less the response attributed to him when he reportedly was surprised to be told he wouldn't be returning for the 1971 season.
A former, younger teammate of Leo Durocher who seemed to lack Durocher's energy while managing the losing team in Chicago (as opposed to the team that couldn't win).

Misfits is an apt description of the 1970 White Sox --two Gold Glove defenders at short and center, a former Gold Glove at second plus a great defensive catcher, and they still managed to have the worst defensive team in the league. So much for strength up the middle. The leftfielder had no thumb, the rightfielder had no neck and the centerfielder had no brain, Cubs fans (despite supposedly ignoring the White Sox) used to say. I don't know what they had against Ken Berry, though.

Bill Melton has said it was tough for Don Gutteridge to move from coach to manager, which required different relationships with the players. Before he became manager, he was more of the friend the players could go to. Then he became the boss.

I came of age as a Sox fan with Don Gutteridge as manager, before I realized any of this, although I recall Eddie Stanky and Al Lopez. The White Sox became fashionable again under Chuck Tanner, and he was the first manager I cared about while he was managing. But over the years, I've wondered if Gutteridge was still alive. There was something reassuring about the lack of a date of death on his Baseball Reference page.

This is sad news.


Mercy! That's a great line.

comet2k
09-09-2008, 08:05 AM
Don Gutteridge was the author of two of my favorite baseball quotes.

Rich Lindberg attributed this to him as he watched Walt Williams shagging fly balls during spring training: "He makes the hard ones look hard."

But my all time favorite was his all too realistic comment on the prospects of the Sox' 1970 starting rotation: "Remember Spahn and Sain and pray for rain? With us it will be Horlen and John and then we get bombed."

Rest in peace, Don.

Mercy, again! That's another winner.

KenBerryGrab
09-09-2008, 09:50 AM
Cubs fans used to say that, and as I said in my post, I don't know what they had against Ken Berry. The only thing I can figure is that he ran into walls to make catches.

When he wasn't flying over them!

Lip Man 1
09-09-2008, 11:48 AM
http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/rwas/index.php?category=11&id=2961

Lip

RCWHITESOX
09-09-2008, 03:29 PM
[quote=hula;2031742]
I did not have a lot of fun watching the 70 Sox. Ashamed to say this, but 1970 was the only year I did not make it to the ballpark except the year I was in Viet Nam. 70 was so bad that when we had a 23 game improvement in 71 it felt like we won a pennant.

I'll second that. The Sox had almost no offense except for Melton and Herrman, and very little pitching except for T. John and W.Wood. J Horlen had a off year and Jerry Janeski and Bart Johnson were horrible. Don Gutteridge must have carved a path between the dugout and the pitching mound. I still can remember him headed to the mound in his baggy uniform. The next year they traded K Berry in a package deal to the the Angels and got the biggest airhead of them all in Jay Johnstone. It had to be in one of the first games of the Season when Wood was pitching and the other team hit a ball out to CF and Johnstone lost the ball and Wood just put his hands on his hips and stared out into Cf.

ttbiggs
09-09-2008, 11:00 PM
Did you all know that Don Gutteridge wrote a book titled: "from the Gas House Gang to the Go-Go Sox: My 50-plus Years in Big League Baseball" ? It is absolutely chalked full of game-by-game descriptions of his playing days as well as his coaching and managing of the Sox. If the thread I'm seeing at this site is any indication, I believe you all would enjoy this book immensely. Don wrote very insightfully and the way the book reads gives you a true feel for Don Gutteridge the man. Most of the copies I've seen are autographed too!