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thomas35forever
08-25-2008, 10:32 PM
The kid's got a fastball that tops 40 MPH.
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=3553475

LoveYourSuit
08-25-2008, 10:39 PM
To ban that kid is complete bull ****.

soltrain21
08-25-2008, 10:43 PM
There is zero way Danny Almonte can pass for a nine year old. You can't ban the kid - you need to encourage him.

soxfan2504
08-26-2008, 01:57 AM
Good old PC America strikes again. Let the kid and his teammates play. God forbid we teach our kids that some people are naturally better at certain things than others. After all, everyone's a winner! Except, of course, the kid who actually is good. This is just overprotection at it's finest.

Not that I'm saying that helping kids become self confident is bad; the problem with this situation is that they're teaching kids that it's okay to avoid challenges that are presented to them. The dumbing down of America continues unabated.

MeteorsSox4367
08-26-2008, 07:57 AM
My 11-year-old nephew plays in a Little League in a south suburb and is likely one of the best players. He's also one of the best pitchers and in the games I saw this season, struck some kids out because he threw - in the words of Hawk - 'gas.'

To ban him or any kid because they throw too hard is just incredibly dumb.

When I played Little League almost 30 years ago, I struck out routinely. Why? Because kids threw hard and although I absolutely love baseball, I just wasn't that good.

Way back when in 1979, my parents responded to my frequent strikeouts with a hug or a pat on the back or news that the Sox were winning that night in an effort to make me feel better.

If this 9-year-old kid throws 40 MPH, God bless 'em. Let the kid play!!!!!

Oblong
08-26-2008, 08:16 AM
I don't know if this article is the same one that I read earlier, I don't read ESPN at work. But the one I read suggested that this could be political in that he was asked to play for one team but instead played for another. Sponsors were involved, yada yada yada. I wouldn't be surprised at all if that's the real reason. Anyone who's been around youth sports lately knows how ugly it can get.

white sox bill
08-26-2008, 08:28 AM
Hummmm, if Broadway doesn't work out and Richard is still getting beat around....

Luke
08-26-2008, 08:47 AM
Wow. This is a new level of out of control.

I enjoyed the part about one team forfeiting when the kid took the mound. I'm fairly certain, even at 9 years old, I would have disowned my own parents for pulling me off a baseball field.

SoxandtheCityTee
08-26-2008, 08:48 AM
As usual, need to hear more of this story to understand it. I did hear that the boy was given a chance to play up -- move to a league for 11-12 year olds -- but I can imagine good reasons why his parents might not want him to do that.

How often would a given opposing player face this pitcher in a season anyway? Twice or three times? And he's never hit anyone. The plot thickens.

chaerulez
08-26-2008, 08:54 AM
It said this league is only a few years old, I would think there is some other more established league he can play in and tell this league to **** off.

kjhanson
08-26-2008, 09:15 AM
40 MPH must be some kind of mistake, or the people of New Haven, Connecticut must be the biggest wimps in the world. The first time I ever threw to a radar gun was when I was ten and I threw 51 MPH. I certainly threw harder than 40 the year before, and I wasn't the hardest thrower in that uber-competitive Woodridge baseball league. I can find two cousins who easily threw harder than 40 when they were nine, and I don't come from a real athletic family. This puzzles me quite a bit.

PennStater98r
08-26-2008, 10:08 AM
It's quite bull**** that the team had to be disbanded and that the other ***** ****ing ******* coaches would forfeit instead of trying to play against the kid...

That said - why wasn't he just moved up to the next age bracket with those skills? If he received a refund for that league - couldn't he have applied it to the next age bracket?

I've also decided that must "adults" are just *******s who have a stick up their asses. I am glad that I am 36 going on 18. There's a reason that I still like video games and playing "Star Wars" figures with my son.

Huisj
08-26-2008, 10:21 AM
40 MPH must be some kind of mistake, or the people of New Haven, Connecticut must be the biggest wimps in the world. The first time I ever threw to a radar gun was when I was ten and I threw 51 MPH. I certainly threw harder than 40 the year before, and I wasn't the hardest thrower in that uber-competitive Woodridge baseball league. I can find two cousins who easily threw harder than 40 when they were nine, and I don't come from a real athletic family. This puzzles me quite a bit.

I was a pitcher in 5th and 6th grade (I was 10 and 11 those years) and in the spring in 6th grade before the season started, I was at a kids science museum and threw 53. Then I threw about 56-57 during a game where some guy brought a radar gun later in the season. And it wasn't like I was a ton bigger then than I had been a year before, because I pitched some that year too. Somehow 40 mph doesn't seem that crazy at all.

Red Barchetta
08-26-2008, 10:34 AM
Good old PC America strikes again. Let the kid and his teammates play. God forbid we teach our kids that some people are naturally better at certain things than others. After all, everyone's a winner! Except, of course, the kid who actually is good. This is just overprotection at it's finest.

Not that I'm saying that helping kids become self confident is bad; the problem with this situation is that they're teaching kids that it's okay to avoid challenges that are presented to them. The dumbing down of America continues unabated.

Well said! Let's focus more on making sure everyone is happy and everyone gets a trophy and no one feels left out, etc. I agree they should perhaps limit his starts (as with any good youth league to prevent over-use and injuries), however to ban him from ever pitching is stupid, unsportsmanlike and disgustingly politically correct.

Bravo to the coach for not backing down. Horrible reaction from the league "officials" and the other parents/teams for not backing the kid. Perhaps if they focused more on how to step up to the challenge of competing against a really good athlete, the opposing players might gain something in return.

Red Barchetta
08-26-2008, 10:40 AM
As usual, need to hear more of this story to understand it. I did hear that the boy was given a chance to play up -- move to a league for 11-12 year olds -- but I can imagine good reasons why his parents might not want him to do that.

How often would a given opposing player face this pitcher in a season anyway? Twice or three times? And he's never hit anyone. The plot thickens.

I don't think that should be the solution. Instead of building his confidence, having him pitch to kids older and bigger, although a challenge, might hurt him instead. The moment they start positioning players in different age groups based on talent, you raise a whole other set of concerns.

My son is 8 and is joining his first league team this fall. I volunteered to help coach and I'm already getting a feel for the politics and political correctness associated with today's league environment.

I know the majority of the coaches and officials involved are truly approaching it from the right way, however there is a small, very vocal minority of parents that look at it from the wrong perspective.

What's sad it that I never see any pick-up games anymore around the neighborhood. Everything is so structured and organized now.

tschneid83
08-26-2008, 10:59 AM
I would assume that if he moved up in age bracket that he would move from a mound that is 35ft to 46ft. For that reason alone you could not ask him to move up an age group. I for some reason think 9 is the cut off and 10 they move to the 46 ft mound. I could be wrong. Anyone know for sure.

pythons007
08-26-2008, 12:12 PM
Pretty soon they will cut little league out just like the cut dodgeball out of P.E. What is that line from Dodgeball? "Dodgeball is a sport of violence, exclusion, and degradation." Soon you will see Little League banned by America because of yada yada yada........

twentywontowin
08-26-2008, 12:13 PM
Pretty soon they will cut little league out just like the cut dodgeball out of P.E. What is that line from Dodgeball? "Dodgeball is a sport of violence, exclusion, and degradation." Soon you will see Little League banned by America because of yada yada yada........

Hell, I think it's bad enough they make every kid have an AB.

fusillirob1983
08-26-2008, 12:14 PM
When I was 9 I threw 35 mph and I was barely 4 feet tall at the time. To put that in context, I'm currently 5'4', had always been the smallest person in my class growing up, and only grew taller than a few girls around soph/junior year of high school.

There's obviously something else involved than him throwing too fast (political, etc.), or by calling it a beginner's baseball league, that means it's a league for kids that never picked up a baseball until a couple months ago.

doublem23
08-26-2008, 12:16 PM
Hell, I think it's bad enough they make every kid have an AB.

I disagree with that; the point of Little League baseball is to have fun and let the kids play. Maybe if your kid is on an advanced, traveling team, that's to be expected, but at a local park, everyone should at least get in the game. Does anyone really care who wins or loses? :dunno:

twentywontowin
08-26-2008, 12:22 PM
I disagree with that; the point of Little League baseball is to have fun and let the kids play. Maybe if your kid is on an advanced, traveling team, that's to be expected, but at a local park, everyone should at least get in the game. Does anyone really care who wins or loses? :dunno:

That's what I meant but I didn't imply it. Competitive baseball. Not the park district leagues.

Vestigio
08-26-2008, 01:33 PM
My dad told a similar story happened to him. He said when he was a in little league, he was told that he couldnt pitch because he would pitch too fast. If I recall correctly, he was forced to play in the outfield...

Iwritecode
08-26-2008, 02:25 PM
When I played there was always a team that had a pitcher that was far and away better than every other pitcher in the league. Everyone hated facing him but we still did it. This was also a league that had the "everyone must play at least 1 full inning and bat at least once" rule.


In my daughter's team this summer there was a team that was better than all the others. Guess what? They only lost 2 games all season and won the end of the year tournament. They deserved it.

Some kids are more advanced than others and there are always going to be kids that either just aren't that good or haven't played much.

I just hate it when the adults get mixed up in this stuff and in the end it's the kids that end up losing.

FedEx227
08-26-2008, 02:32 PM
The only problem that stems from this though is the kids that may not be good, aren't taught baseball, but instead winning is the key objective, which at 9 I'd say teaching these kids is much more important.

I can talk from personal experience, I was on a back-to-back city championship team when I was 9-10. I couldn't hit a lick and thus was not played very often, it didn't hurt me all that much though because I was a great defender at 1B/SS, so I would usually be substituted towards the end of the games for defense.

But really, at 9-10 years old I'm not playing until the last 2 innings? I'm being benched regularly, I'm not getting properly taught what was wrong with my swing (my head was all over the place) yet they didn't have time to TEACH kids, no we were interested in winning a foot high trophy made out of plastic.

While I don't think this kid shouldn't play, why isn't he in a more advanced league? Clearly he's above and beyond all of these kids and clearly he wants to compete at a high level so bump him up, put him in with the 11 year olds, that sort of stuff happens all the time.

I agree kids need to know disappointment and need to know that people will be better than them, I totally agree, but at what age does teaching baseball not become the top priority? Why is winning with 9-10 year olds that barely understand the game important? There's an outside chance the 9 year old that doesn't play because he can't hit, can maybe get some lessons and become a damn good baseball player down the line. However AT NINE we're already saying "Yeah, you're bad, we're benching you." That's bull**** to me. Teach the ****ing kids until they are 12-14, then worry about winning.

turners56
08-26-2008, 03:04 PM
The kid's got a fastball that tops 40 MPH.
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=3553475

My brother is 6 years old and he can hit my lobs at around 40 MPH, that is complete BS.

Tell the kids that play with him to stop sucking.

Woofer
08-26-2008, 04:01 PM
Back when I was in little league during the late 1970's-early to mid 1980's, there was a kid on one of the compeating teams that was a fireball pitcher. In fact later on, he pitched as high as Triple AAA in the White Sox organization. He was impossible to beat, but what did we do back then, EXTRA PRACTICE! The day before we were going to face him, our team took extra batting practice in the fast pitch batting cages. Did it help? Not one bit, but I did end up getting a few hits off of him. I really hoped that he would make it to the big leagues, but I don't think he ever did.
Unless that 9 year old is on steroids, there is no way he shouldn't be pitching. Especially if he is good. It would be a shame for his talent to be wasted.

It's Dankerific
08-26-2008, 05:42 PM
I agree kids need to know disappointment and need to know that people will be better than them, I totally agree, but at what age does teaching baseball not become the top priority? Why is winning with 9-10 year olds that barely understand the game important? There's an outside chance the 9 year old that doesn't play because he can't hit, can maybe get some lessons and become a damn good baseball player down the line. However AT NINE we're already saying "Yeah, you're bad, we're benching you." That's bull**** to me. Teach the ****ing kids until they are 12-14, then worry about winning.

I disagree. Practices are times to TEACH the kids how to play. The games should be used for rewarding the players that have been practicing and doing well. It seems awfully irresponsible to teach a kid that he doesn't have to spend more time working on something if he is not good at it or that sometimes there's just a better guy with a better arm.

When I was in little league, we practiced more than we played games. Everyone practiced. If you didn't come to practice, you didn't get to play in the game, "star" or not. When we played, we played where we would do well. If the game was out of hand, other people got into the game. EVERYONE had fun. No one thought it was their right to get on the field every damn game.

FedEx227
08-26-2008, 05:54 PM
I disagree. Practices are times to TEACH the kids how to play. The games should be used for rewarding the players that have been practicing and doing well. It seems awfully irresponsible to teach a kid that he doesn't have to spend more time working on something if he is not good at it or that sometimes there's just a better guy with a better arm.

Practices teach you very little about the game of baseball. Baseball is one of the hardest sports to learn through practice, most people will agree with that. In basketball you can at least scrimmage and it will typically act and play like a real basketball game, ditto for football, but there is no way you can simulate an actual game of baseball through practice unless your team happens to be 18 deep.

When I was in little league, we practiced more than we played games. Everyone practiced.

Same.


If you didn't come to practice, you didn't get to play in the game, "star" or not.

Not on my back-to-back title team.

When we played, we played where we would do well. If the game was out of hand, other people got into the game. EVERYONE had fun. No one thought it was their right to get on the field every damn game.

Are you sure everyone had fun? Or are you just assuming. You say nobody did hard work, unfortunately at age 9, you sort of need some coaching.

I would have loved to have stayed after practice, go before practice to learn hitting, the coaches weren't interested in having me get better. I recall one or two sessions with a former MLB player and former Sox shortstop (I'll get the name from my dad) who tried to teach me some stuff, well he hardly came to games or practices because he didn't want to be overbearing on his son. Anyway he came out once or twice when he could and after those days I would usually have great games.

Did the other coaches continue the teaching? Nope. Instead it was me over at first base in the 6th inning. I didn't mind it at all, I was just frustrated that proper coaching was never used to help me with very minor, mechanical swing problems, apparently shouting "Keep your eye on the ball" every 8 at-bats was just about enough for the old ball coaches (neither of whom knew **** about baseball).

I was already mediocre, so why not just worry about our good players so we can take home some gold-painted plastic.

That's the situation that we're discussing here. At age 9, it's not as if you can STAY after practice and learn baseball. With basketball you can focus on your shooting, shoot until it's dark out. You can throw a football through a tire all night as well. I certainly can't simulate a curve ball being thrown at me now can I?

pearso66
08-26-2008, 06:09 PM
I saw this kid on the local news today. I don't think it was brought up, but they mentioned that the kid beat a team that had won the last 2 league championships, and the coach of the team was the head of the league or something like that. I don't know if the reason was that he beat that team, but it sure sent a red flag up in my book.

Fenway
08-26-2008, 06:33 PM
from the New Haven paper

http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=20090822&BRD=1281&PAG=461&dept_id=635049&rfi=6

A. Cavatica
08-26-2008, 06:44 PM
Way back when in 1979, my parents responded to my frequent strikeouts with a hug or a pat on the back or news that the Sox were winning that night in an effort to make me feel better.

1979? Must have been hugs or pats on the back most nights. :D:

It's Dankerific
08-26-2008, 07:07 PM
Are you sure everyone had fun? Or are you just assuming. You say nobody did hard work, unfortunately at age 9, you sort of need some coaching.

I would have loved to have stayed after practice, go before practice to learn hitting, the coaches weren't interested in having me get better. I recall one or two sessions with a former MLB player and former Sox shortstop (I'll get the name from my dad) who tried to teach me some stuff, well he hardly came to games or practices because he didn't want to be overbearing on his son. Anyway he came out once or twice when he could and after those days I would usually have great games.

Did the other coaches continue the teaching? Nope. Instead it was me over at first base in the 6th inning. I didn't mind it at all, I was just frustrated that proper coaching was never used to help me with very minor, mechanical swing problems, apparently shouting "Keep your eye on the ball" every 8 at-bats was just about enough for the old ball coaches (neither of whom knew **** about baseball).

I was already mediocre, so why not just worry about our good players so we can take home some gold-painted plastic.

That's the situation that we're discussing here. At age 9, it's not as if you can STAY after practice and learn baseball. With basketball you can focus on your shooting, shoot until it's dark out. You can throw a football through a tire all night as well. I certainly can't simulate a curve ball being thrown at me now can I?

I'm sure everyone had fun. I was friendly with everyone on the team. My dad ended up helping the coach with the team so I was around early/late. I wasn't the best player on the team. I moved around from early in the season playing 3b/1b to late in the season getting to pitch. the next year I was too old to pitch so I played 1b.

It sounds like you had a bad group of coaches on the team, and for that I'm sorry. My dad spent time with everyone who wanted to get better, whether that meant getting there 15-30 mins before practice or watching us all play a pick up game after the coach went home.

But still, there was no enforced quota on game time. And people who didnt want to try (by showing up to practice, fooling off when we were practicing) just didnt get to start games. Also, i'm not sure about how you need 18 people to have a real simulated practice. we had, i dunno 12-15 kids and we'd field the diamond with 9 players and rotate the hitters. Count 3 outs, all that. Now maybe we didn't get every little nuance of the game, but we were kids. we knew when to try to hit opposite field, when to hit it on the ground. when to hit a fly ball, etc.

kitekrazy
08-26-2008, 07:17 PM
Good old PC America strikes again. Let the kid and his teammates play. God forbid we teach our kids that some people are naturally better at certain things than others. After all, everyone's a winner! Except, of course, the kid who actually is good. This is just overprotection at it's finest.

Not that I'm saying that helping kids become self confident is bad; the problem with this situation is that they're teaching kids that it's okay to avoid challenges that are presented to them. The dumbing down of America continues unabated.

Excellent post. We are seeing plenty of pussification in sports and it's creeping up to the big leagues. Stone often mentions how the game has changed and fewer pitchers throw inside.

Kids are so different these days. In Little League when I struck out I wanted to work on my hitting even more. Today kids just quit.

kitekrazy
08-26-2008, 07:27 PM
My 11-year-old nephew plays in a Little League in a south suburb and is likely one of the best players. He's also one of the best pitchers and in the games I saw this season, struck some kids out because he threw - in the words of Hawk - 'gas.'

To ban him or any kid because they throw too hard is just incredibly dumb.

When I played Little League almost 30 years ago, I struck out routinely. Why? Because kids threw hard and although I absolutely love baseball, I just wasn't that good.

Way back when in 1979, my parents responded to my frequent strikeouts with a hug or a pat on the back or news that the Sox were winning that night in an effort to make me feel better.

If this 9-year-old kid throws 40 MPH, God bless 'em. Let the kid play!!!!!

We had a kid that was the Nolan Ryan of Little League. You were scared to death he might hit you but he had excellent control. I had to "man up" and let the first 2 go for a strike and swing at the next one and sit down knowing I only have to face him once or twice. I figured if I swung at one I wouldn't be such a wuss.

From what I've read this kid has great control with his 40mph heater. Most coaches I don't think would let that kid pitch if he was wild.

kitekrazy
08-26-2008, 07:33 PM
40 MPH must be some kind of mistake, or the people of New Haven, Connecticut must be the biggest wimps in the world.

I think it's the whole state. I think in that state high school football coaches can be suspended for running up a score.

kitekrazy
08-26-2008, 07:38 PM
As usual, need to hear more of this story to understand it. I did hear that the boy was given a chance to play up -- move to a league for 11-12 year olds -- but I can imagine good reasons why his parents might not want him to do that.


There can be a major difference in size between a 9 yr old boy and a 12 yr old.

jdm2662
08-26-2008, 07:50 PM
First off, I have no doubt this kid somehow upset some higher up. This was mentioned before. Like everyone else said, if you can't beat him, boo hoo. Go whine some where else. I find this 40 MPH laughable. My cousin, who is 11 but the size of a 9 year old, pitches in the 50s with no problem. Hell, my noodle arm topped 40 when I was a kid. Spiffie can verify the fine athlete I was growing up. :redneck

Obviously different neighboorhoods had different rules. We had three leagues. Pioneer was the father pitch league. That was just played for fun. We kept score (one game, we won 40-3), and we wanted to win, but there were no official standings kept.

After that, you had minor (8-10), little league (9-12), and senior/pony (13-15). You played a regular season (usually had 6-10 teams in each league), and then a double elimination playoffs. Everyone was in the lineup, and a player had to play at least three innings in the field. Most teams had 12 players at most, so playing time wasn't really an issue. I played on two championship teams, and stopped playing at the end of minor league. My brother, with the same coaching staff, was on the two teams I was on, won two other championships, and the two years they didn't win, they did finish first in the regular season.

There was one player in particular that played on my brother's team. He was a new player at 10 in Little League. He was a very weak player his first year, but he became a pretty productive player by the time he moved up to senior league. Well, another coaching staff got him, and the player didn't do well at all. The coach asked my Dad how they got him to play so well. My Dad simply answered, because we work with every single player on the side. We don't take favorites. Most teams were on the field 30 mins before the game. My brother's little league teams were there 60 mins taking batting practice and extra fielding practice.

I myself was a very bad baseball player, but I had a respectable season my last year I played. I ended up batting third on the championship team. I couldn't hit the ball much, but they worked with me to where I can hit the ball in a certain spot and leg them out. God bless my speed... I also was a horrible fielder, but I improved for the same reasons. Knowing this, I knew the stuff I did had no chance in Little League. I didn't play again because I knew I was going to get yelled at by all the kids. One of our coaches assured my father it won't happen, we'll work with him, etc. Realisically, I had no chance, and decided to hang it up. I might've improved, but I was not a gifted athlete and smaller than average. Sadly, this type of coaching isn't the norm these days.

kitekrazy
08-26-2008, 07:57 PM
I know the majority of the coaches and officials involved are truly approaching it from the right way, however there is a small, very vocal minority of parents that look at it from the wrong perspective.

What's sad it that I never see any pick-up games anymore around the neighborhood. Everything is so structured and organized now.

It seems parent don't know how to deal with their kids in sports. Any slight moment of success they think their kid can be a pro. I see so often parents get too carried away and not even notice that some kids grow out of wanting to play a certain sport and move onto another. My nephew is dealing with this. He's become less interested in baseball and more into basketball. For some odd reason dad thinks he might be able to play baseball at the pro level. Most people don't realize at the high school your stats have to be unrealistic like batting .600 for the big leagues to look at you.

I concur with your last statement. I never see pick up games. We oten couldn't use a real baseball because of our environment. We used tennis balls or a wiffle ball.

As a public school teacher I've gotten to dislike organized sports at the grade school level during the school year. It seems more out of hand with soccer. Kid lives have become so structured that there is no ability for them to be creative. Families no longer have a dinner time. It's get the kids off to practice and pickup something at McDonalds after practice. Coed sports are another evil. Boys think its OK to hit girls now.

Bucky F. Dent
08-26-2008, 08:03 PM
Absolute crap!

Let the kid play.

fusillirob1983
08-26-2008, 08:22 PM
The only problem that stems from this though is the kids that may not be good, aren't taught baseball, but instead winning is the key objective, which at 9 I'd say teaching these kids is much more important.

I can talk from personal experience, I was on a back-to-back city championship team when I was 9-10. I couldn't hit a lick and thus was not played very often, it didn't hurt me all that much though because I was a great defender at 1B/SS, so I would usually be substituted towards the end of the games for defense.

But really, at 9-10 years old I'm not playing until the last 2 innings? I'm being benched regularly, I'm not getting properly taught what was wrong with my swing (my head was all over the place) yet they didn't have time to TEACH kids, no we were interested in winning a foot high trophy made out of plastic.

While I don't think this kid shouldn't play, why isn't he in a more advanced league? Clearly he's above and beyond all of these kids and clearly he wants to compete at a high level so bump him up, put him in with the 11 year olds, that sort of stuff happens all the time.

I agree kids need to know disappointment and need to know that people will be better than them, I totally agree, but at what age does teaching baseball not become the top priority? Why is winning with 9-10 year olds that barely understand the game important? There's an outside chance the 9 year old that doesn't play because he can't hit, can maybe get some lessons and become a damn good baseball player down the line. However AT NINE we're already saying "Yeah, you're bad, we're benching you." That's bull**** to me. Teach the ****ing kids until they are 12-14, then worry about winning.

Agreed that teaching wasn't a priority. Actually, I was taught something when I played little league. I was taught how to crouch so I could draw more walks. When I was 8, during a 14 game season, I was 0 for 0 with 3 or 4 walks in 6 of those games. I think I put the ball in play twice that season on a couple of the rare occasions that it was actually worth swinging.

soxinem1
08-28-2008, 02:37 PM
Personally, I don't think 40 is a lot for a nine-year old, but that league is obviously different level of play. granted, it's good, but should not be unhittable.

Having been a little league coach for years, and having Soxinem1, Jr. hit 55MPH as a ten year old with a 12 to 6 changeup using the same arm-speed as his heater, we as a league have the philosophy to develop a kid like mine, others, and this nine-year old. We would love to have a kid that put everyone away, and have him geared up for the District All-Stars.

Some people are just jealous, self-consumed, and only think of themselves and their kid for whiffing too many times. If you kid whiffs too much, tell him/her to practice and get better if they want to play.

As time goes on, you will love facing guys who throw hard over those who change speeds well.

ChiSoxFan7
08-28-2008, 03:14 PM
could they not move him up. or just deal with it. It's one loss and who knows maybe your kids will learn that in sports there is always someone who is better you...



For a team to show up then walk off is just ludicrous. who does that? Shame to the parents for destroying the game for the kids...:angry: