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comet2k
08-25-2008, 02:11 PM
... a double by Cabrera yesterday, and the guy behind me complained that I was blocking his view. He said, "It's okay to stand up for a home run, but not a double." :?:

I had never heard anything like that from the Behavior Police before, and I told him I'd decide when to stand up and cheer, and he took umbrage at that. It didn't get nasty, partly because I didn't continue the argument, but geez I wasn't being a Jack in the Box bouncing up and down constantly, just cheering for something good by the Sox.

The irony is that throughout the game, people in my row, the one behind and the ones in front of us were getting up and returning in the middle of plays, and he never complained about that. To top it off, he and his friend left in the 8th inning after one said to the other, "Let's stand up to watch the rest of the game."

I don't like it when people get up in the middle of an at bat, but I figure it's part of being at the game, so deal with it. Can't we all just get along?

UofCSoxFan
08-25-2008, 02:13 PM
... a double by Cabrera yesterday, and the guy behind me complained that I was blocking his view. He said, "It's okay to stand up for a home run, but not a double." :?:

I had never heard anything like that from the Behavior Police before, and I told him I'd decide when to stand up and cheer, and he took umbrage at that. It didn't get nasty, partly because I didn't continue the argument, but geez I wasn't being a Jack in the Box bouncing up and down constantly, just cheering for something good by the Sox.

The irony is that throughout the game, people in my row, the one behind and the ones in front of us were getting up and returning in the middle of plays, and he never complained about that. To top it off, he and his friend left in the 8th inning after one said to the other, "Let's stand up to watch the rest of the game."

I don't like it when people get up in the middle of an at bat, but I figure it's part of being at the game, so deal with it. Can't we all just get along?

This is where you respond to the guy "Too bad you didn't buy a ticket 2 rows closer to the field."

Seriously. There is nothing wrong with standing up to cheer a good play.

Konerko05
08-25-2008, 02:18 PM
The last game I was at, some guy asked me why my friends and I were standing with two outs in the ninth. I turned around and said, "because it's the last out of the game." He started mumbling about how we were up by 5 and it's not a playoff game. So much stuff I wanted to say, but I just kept my mouth shut.

Law11
08-25-2008, 02:18 PM
I would have started standing for a walk...

UofCSoxFan
08-25-2008, 02:22 PM
The last game I was at, some guy asked me why my friends and I were standing with two outs in the ninth. I turned around and said, "because it's the last out of the game." He started mumbling about how we were up by 5 and it's not a playoff game. So much stuff I wanted to say, but I just kept my mouth shut.

Guys like that should watch the game on their tv at home. They'd be more comfortable.

TDog
08-25-2008, 02:23 PM
That reminds me of the time in the mid-1970s (maybe 1976 -- it might have been Crazy Comb night) when I was in the last row of the upper deck in Old Comiskey next to the press box, so that I couldn't see anything in the foul territory behind the hitter and couldn't follow the path of fly balls. It was the eighth inning. I could hear the reporters typing their little stories a few feet away, and my friend and I were standing. An usher told us to sit down.

It is OK to stand up for a double. It's OK to stand up for a single. It's OK to stand up for a great defensive play.

It's not OK to stand up when the wave comes around.

KenBerryGrab
08-25-2008, 02:35 PM
The same guy who complained probably also stands to make a beer order and to receive change.

BigP50
08-25-2008, 03:13 PM
I would have started standing for a walk...


I would stand up for a ball :D:

CashMan
08-25-2008, 03:16 PM
... a double by Cabrera yesterday, and the guy behind me complained that I was blocking his view. He said, "It's okay to stand up for a home run, but not a double." :?:

I had never heard anything like that from the Behavior Police before, and I told him I'd decide when to stand up and cheer, and he took umbrage at that. It didn't get nasty, partly because I didn't continue the argument, but geez I wasn't being a Jack in the Box bouncing up and down constantly, just cheering for something good by the Sox.

The irony is that throughout the game, people in my row, the one behind and the ones in front of us were getting up and returning in the middle of plays, and he never complained about that. To top it off, he and his friend left in the 8th inning after one said to the other, "Let's stand up to watch the rest of the game."

I don't like it when people get up in the middle of an at bat, but I figure it's part of being at the game, so deal with it. Can't we all just get along?


You can't contain yourself and clap in your seat?

bigsoxfan420
08-25-2008, 03:19 PM
... a double by Cabrera yesterday, and the guy behind me complained that I was blocking his view. He said, "It's okay to stand up for a home run, but not a double." :?:

I had never heard anything like that from the Behavior Police before, and I told him I'd decide when to stand up and cheer, and he took umbrage at that. It didn't get nasty, partly because I didn't continue the argument, but geez I wasn't being a Jack in the Box bouncing up and down constantly, just cheering for something good by the Sox.

The irony is that throughout the game, people in my row, the one behind and the ones in front of us were getting up and returning in the middle of plays, and he never complained about that. To top it off, he and his friend left in the 8th inning after one said to the other, "Let's stand up to watch the rest of the game."

I don't like it when people get up in the middle of an at bat, but I figure it's part of being at the game, so deal with it. Can't we all just get along?

That sounds crazy. Were you standing for a long time? Maybe he was just annoyed with you in general (i.e. were you talking throughout the game, sweaing ,etc.). If not then, that dude is just not a baseball fan.

Nellie_Fox
08-25-2008, 03:21 PM
You can't contain yourself and clap in your seat?
I hope this is "teal implied." I'm a grumpy old man with achy knees, and I'd be up cheering for a double myself.:geezer:

kevingrt
08-25-2008, 03:24 PM
I hope this is "teal implied." I'm a grumpy old man with achy knees, and I'd be up cheering for a double myself.:geezer:

Everyone loves the old guy that stands up and gives high fives around after big plays. :bandance:

cws05champ
08-25-2008, 03:39 PM
Everyone loves the old guy that stands up and gives high fives around after big plays. :bandance:
I love the that guy that stands up and turns to the crowd waving his arms, cheering and jeering to get the rest of the crowd to stand up......not really.

SaltyPretzel
08-25-2008, 03:42 PM
The same guy who complained probably also stands to make a beer order and to receive change.

That's probably my biggest pet peeve. Why is it necessary to stand up to get your wallet out of your pocket?

tonyho7476
08-25-2008, 03:42 PM
That reminds me of the time in the mid-1970s (maybe 1976 -- it might have been Crazy Comb night) when I was in the last row of the upper deck in Old Comiskey next to the press box, so that I couldn't see anything in the foul territory behind the hitter and couldn't follow the path of fly balls. It was the eighth inning. I could hear the reporters typing their little stories a few feet away, and my friend and I were standing. An usher told us to sit down.

It is OK to stand up for a double. It's OK to stand up for a single. It's OK to stand up for a great defensive play.

It's not OK to stand up when the wave comes around.

Seriously, in the last week, the crowd has been wave crazy. I guess that's what happens when newbies show up.

cbone
08-25-2008, 03:46 PM
Let me ask where everyone "stands" on this issue. Pauly is coming up to pinch-hit. The guy 2 rows in front of me stands up and starts doing the "everybody up" thing completely blocking my view and the people in front of me. The guy in front of me tapped him on the shoulder and said "No one can see, can you sit down?" The guy behind me wasn't as nice. The young man finally sat down. I don't want to stand up for a whole rally. I am the first up to high five after a great play. Where do you draw the line?

comet2k
08-25-2008, 03:50 PM
That sounds crazy. Were you standing for a long time? Maybe he was just annoyed with you in general (i.e. were you talking throughout the game, sweaing ,etc.). If not then, that dude is just not a baseball fan.

No, my son and I stood up as Cabrera was getting into second and the throw was coming in. I'm not a loudmouth who throws F-bombs and other swear words around, so I can't see how I would have offended him. We just like to stand up and cheer when something good happens, and sometimes that can be for a sacrifice bunt in the right situation.

I was just surprised that another Sox fan would object to me cheering for our team. He may be a fan, but if he can't deal with that, maybe he should stay home.

I thought about asking if he had trouble standing up (didn't appear so when he left) but didn't want to continue the conversation nor risk offending him. These are our regular seats for weekend games, so we may see each other again. If it does, maybe I could offer to trade seats, so we would be behind him, but the more I think about it, it's his problem, not mine.

Boondock Saint
08-25-2008, 04:00 PM
I bet he was already peeved at you for some reason. If I'm at a ballgame and someone in front of me is standing up because of a good play, I'm probably the guy he's high-fiving. The only reason I'd be complaining about that is if I was already looking for some reason to go off on you.

edit: just saw your last post. Screw trading seats with the guy. You didn't do anything wrong. If he's being pissy about people standing up and cheering, he can either buy better seats or stay home and watch the game.

comet2k
08-25-2008, 04:02 PM
Let me ask where everyone "stands" on this issue. Pauly is coming up to pinch-hit. The guy 2 rows in front of me stands up and starts doing the "everybody up" thing completely blocking my view and the people in front of me. The guy in front of me tapped him on the shoulder and said "No one can see, can you sit down?" The guy behind me wasn't as nice. The young man finally sat down. I don't want to stand up for a whole rally. I am the first up to high five after a great play. Where do you draw the line?

If the people in front of me stand up for something like that, I would join them instead of asking them to sit down so I don't miss the play. I guess one of my points is that every game I go to I put up with people coming and going in front of me during the game, oblivious to the fact they're blocking my view and others'. Instead of making an issue of it, I let it pass. With a lot of those same people, the only time they get up is to go back to the concession stand or the washroom.

What's wrong with standing and cheering for the Sox when you think it's deserved?

Max Power
08-25-2008, 04:03 PM
No, my son and I stood up as Cabrera was getting into second and the throw was coming in.


I don't even understand why he would be angry. The play was over, or essentially over, so what did he need to see? I don't see an issue as long as you sat down by the time the next pitch was thrown.

soxinem1
08-25-2008, 04:09 PM
There have been some real *******s at White Sox games in the past few years.

I went last week with Soxinem1, Jr. and a friend of his, and the people next to us complained about them cheering. You could tell by the looks on the faces of the entire family that they did not like baseball, The Cell, fans, etc. They were totally comatose the first three innings.

Thinking they might be too loud, though, I asked the old guy and his pals behind us and the group in front if the boys were too loud, to let us know, and all of them said 'Its a ball game, you are supposed to cheer.'

In the 4th Inning, the lady idiot jumps up and screams 'I can't take it anymore', and actually goes up to the usher to try to get thtem tossed from the game! Shortly afterward, the rest of them left mumbling dumb comments. The entire two rows gave them a good 'Go to Wrigley' teasing.

I asked those around us again if the boys were too loud, and again all of them said they were not going overboard, or too loud.

Then a little later, one of the security guys comes down to get the 1983 souvenier cups they left, and told us 'what a wierd group, did they think this was a tennis match or something?'

If someone is swearing or talking **** I could understand. But a couple of 12-13 year olds getting into the game, well, geez!

CWSpalehoseCWS
08-25-2008, 04:21 PM
... a double by Cabrera yesterday, and the guy behind me complained that I was blocking his view. He said, "It's okay to stand up for a home run, but not a double." :?:

I had never heard anything like that from the Behavior Police before, and I told him I'd decide when to stand up and cheer, and he took umbrage at that. It didn't get nasty, partly because I didn't continue the argument, but geez I wasn't being a Jack in the Box bouncing up and down constantly, just cheering for something good by the Sox.

The irony is that throughout the game, people in my row, the one behind and the ones in front of us were getting up and returning in the middle of plays, and he never complained about that. To top it off, he and his friend left in the 8th inning after one said to the other, "Let's stand up to watch the rest of the game."

I don't like it when people get up in the middle of an at bat, but I figure it's part of being at the game, so deal with it. Can't we all just get along?

I was at the back-to-back-to-back-to-back HR game and after the 4th one was hit me and 3 friends were standing up cheering. Apparently the guy a few rows back thought we stood a little too long and asked us to sit down. Other people were still standing around us.

basilesox
08-25-2008, 05:06 PM
Let me ask where everyone "stands" on this issue. Pauly is coming up to pinch-hit. The guy 2 rows in front of me stands up and starts doing the "everybody up" thing completely blocking my view and the people in front of me. The guy in front of me tapped him on the shoulder and said "No one can see, can you sit down?" The guy behind me wasn't as nice. The young man finally sat down. I don't want to stand up for a whole rally. I am the first up to high five after a great play. Where do you draw the line?

Seriously bro..If you cant stand up when Paulie comes up to the plate with 2 outs in the Ninth, tying run on second, down by one, you shouldnt be going to the game. Everyone in my entire section was standing for that at bat and pretty much everyone in the stadium:scratch:

Frankfan4life
08-25-2008, 06:04 PM
Let me ask where everyone "stands" on this issue. Pauly is coming up to pinch-hit. The guy 2 rows in front of me stands up and starts doing the "everybody up" thing completely blocking my view and the people in front of me. The guy in front of me tapped him on the shoulder and said "No one can see, can you sit down?" The guy behind me wasn't as nice. The young man finally sat down. I don't want to stand up for a whole rally. I am the first up to high five after a great play. Where do you draw the line?I have a different complaint. I was at the game on Saturday and I was sitting in back of a group of about a dozen Rays fans. In the ninth inning when Griffey came to the plate, they all stood up and starting clapping for the third out. I yelled at them to sit down (after all they were blocking my view of the batter in my home ballpark). After Griffey either took a ball or fouled off a pitch (I don't know which because I couldn't see), they must have thought about it and just sat down and clapped after that.

I didn't think it was appropriate for them to stand and block my view but one of the guys I was with said he didn't mind it. I would never think of doing that in an opponent's ballpark. Was I right to be upset?

As for your situation, I agree with you. I go to the ballpark to yell and scream. I like to see fans who are enthusiastic and into the game. Of course, I make an effort not to upstage fans when I'm in their ballpark.

EuroSox35
08-25-2008, 06:26 PM
As I grow older I am starting to hate going to sporting events, which is a shame. Yesterday I hear some grumpy old man behind us yell at some kids ('for screaming too loud and be annoying', the dad didn't say anything, but let's just say it's a good thing I wasn't him). The same guy was dissing the empty seats for yesterday's game (I know, *** right?), and then started talking about the Cubs (he referred to them as the Flubs, which I always see here, so he may post here. If you're reading this, you suck)

Then, Exhibit B, the drunken idiot who can't hold his beer. This guy just decides to stand up at a random point in the middle of the game and starts watching the game standing. People a section over ask him to sit down and he yells "shut up" while holding up his middle finger. There were classier people in the section so they didn't really retaliate. He went on to sit down. Later in the game he would do the "everyone get up!" motions with his hands with that finger sticking out, and then kept smacking his 500 pound girlfriend's butt. She wasn't happy about it, but I can't give her any sympathy for being with a scumbag like that.

In short, I'm just ****ing sick of all these idiots either being the behavior police (like with the standing stuff) or trying to start crap just because they're idiots and feel like big men in front of people with families. It's a game not some biker bar

Dick Allen
08-25-2008, 06:32 PM
As I grow older I am starting to hate going to sporting events, which is a shame. Yesterday I hear some grumpy old man behind us yell at some kids ('for screaming too loud and be annoying', the dad didn't say anything, but let's just say it's a good thing I wasn't him). The same guy was dissing the empty seats for yesterday's game (I know, *** right?), and then started talking about the Cubs (he referred to them as the Flubs, which I always see here, so he may post here. If you're reading this, you suck)

Then, Exhibit B, the drunken idiot who can't hold his beer. This guy just decides to stand up at a random point in the middle of the game and starts watching the game standing. People a section over ask him to sit down and he yells "shut up" while holding up his middle finger. There were classier people in the section so they didn't really retaliate. He went on to sit down. Later in the game he would do the "everyone get up!" motions with his hands with that finger sticking out, and then kept smacking his 500 pound girlfriend's butt. She wasn't happy about it, but I can't give her any sympathy for being with a scumbag like that.

In short, I'm just ****ing sick of all these idiots either being the behavior police (like with the standing stuff) or trying to start crap just because they're idiots and feel like big men in front of people with families. It's a game not some biker barThis is one reason why I've cut down significantly on the number of games I've gone to this year. People standing up in front of you all the time like they think they're the only ones in the park. Too many people who apparently think the game on the field is secondary to everything else going on. People who should be watching the game in a bar instead of at the park. The increase in the number of inconsiderate morons each year at the park is staggering.

Quentin08
08-25-2008, 06:44 PM
These people would have a fit if they went to Wrigley. Every time I catch a Cubs game at Wrigley on tv, the entire crowd stands up in unison when anything remotely exciting happens. Even at the beginning of the 9th, with the Cubs down by 1, the crowd is up. It even seems like every 3-2 count, the crowd stands up all at once.

I've never seen our crowd do that at the Cell. If the crowd stands up, it's like everyone is hesitant to stand, but slowly but surely 90% of the crowd is up.. people in the Scouts Seats are never into the game and never standing up.. except for that one spaz in green.. gotta love that guy.:D:

CashMan
08-25-2008, 06:48 PM
Let me ask where everyone "stands" on this issue. Pauly is coming up to pinch-hit. The guy 2 rows in front of me stands up and starts doing the "everybody up" thing completely blocking my view and the people in front of me. The guy in front of me tapped him on the shoulder and said "No one can see, can you sit down?" The guy behind me wasn't as nice. The young man finally sat down. I don't want to stand up for a whole rally. I am the first up to high five after a great play. Where do you draw the line?

I would say, a BIG strikeout or a HR, you can stand, I see now reason to stand for doubles. I think in the 9th and it is close, it is ok to stand. I treat it like driving, don't be oblivious to the people around you.

Frontman
08-25-2008, 06:55 PM
Which raises the question. So if this guy doesn't want you to stand for a great play, when precisely can you stand during a home run?

When the pitch is thrown,
the ball is struck by the bat,
the ball is halfway to the stands,
the ball passes over the fence,
or the ball lands in the seats?

I figure if you remain standing for long, then you're open to someone taking issue; but in my mind, if you pop out of your seat for a great hit or a great defensive play, that's part of the fun of watching sports.

For crying out loud, I stood up for Paulie's hit AND I WAS AT HOME!!!

:D:

dakuda
08-25-2008, 06:58 PM
That reminds me of the time in the mid-1970s (maybe 1976 -- it might have been Crazy Comb night) when I was in the last row of the upper deck in Old Comiskey next to the press box, so that I couldn't see anything in the foul territory behind the hitter and couldn't follow the path of fly balls. It was the eighth inning. I could hear the reporters typing their little stories a few feet away, and my friend and I were standing. An usher told us to sit down.

It is OK to stand up for a double. It's OK to stand up for a single. It's OK to stand up for a great defensive play.

It's not OK to stand up when the wave comes around.

Darn thing went around 5-6 times on Saturday. :(:

Frontman
08-25-2008, 07:03 PM
Darn thing went around 5-6 times on Saturday. :(:

If the guy next to you stand for it, clothesline him.

dakuda
08-25-2008, 07:06 PM
If the guy next to you stand for it, clothesline him.


I was in handicap seating. They next to me was my old man, he doesn't get up for much anymore. :smile:

CashMan
08-25-2008, 07:09 PM
Which raises the question. So if this guy doesn't want you to stand for a great play, when precisely can you stand during a home run?

When the pitch is thrown,
the ball is struck by the bat,
the ball is halfway to the stands,
the ball passes over the fence,
or the ball lands in the seats?

I figure if you remain standing for long, then you're open to someone taking issue; but in my mind, if you pop out of your seat for a great hit or a great defensive play, that's part of the fun of watching sports.

For crying out loud, I stood up for Paulie's hit AND I WAS AT HOME!!!

:D:

Standing up in the 9th is no problem. As for when to stand up when it is a homerun, when it starts looking like it will go out. Do you really need to stand for a double? I mean seriously. I can understand a triple.

BadBobbyJenks
08-25-2008, 07:23 PM
Darn thing went around 5-6 times on Saturday. :(:

I really don't care if the wave goes around in a blow out, but that wave on Saturday was with the bases loaded in a 3-1 game in the 8th inning. Embarrassing. A few of us voiced our displeasure in section 111 and the sheep took the hint and stopped.

MarySwiss
08-25-2008, 07:30 PM
I have no problem with people standing and cheering when something actually happens.

But have you ever been behind one of those whole rows of idiot friends who are there strictly to socialize? Who NEVER seem to sit the hell down? And who for some reason think they all have to stand up anytime there's a beer coming down the row?

Konerko05
08-25-2008, 08:16 PM
As our attendence grows, our fans get worse.

I feel embarassed while the wave is going around, especially in crucial situations.

TheCommander
08-25-2008, 09:06 PM
No, my son and I stood up as Cabrera was getting into second and the throw was coming in.

I didn't watch the whole game(work) and missed this part. If it was a close play,I could understand the guy not wanting his view blocked. Otherwise, he should have kept his trap shut. :smile:

doublem23
08-25-2008, 09:15 PM
Darn thing went around 5-6 times on Saturday. :(:

Yeah, I was over by the section where that started (506)...

Bleeeeeeegh.

chisoxmike
08-25-2008, 09:33 PM
... a double by Cabrera yesterday, and the guy behind me complained that I was blocking his view. He said, "It's okay to stand up for a home run, but not a double." :?:



Sadly, I see this happen all the time at games. Even when fans are standing during a runner on third situation or something like that, somebody yells "Down in front."

It's embarrassing.

alohafri
08-25-2008, 09:53 PM
I have no problem with people standing and cheering when something actually happens.

But have you ever been behind one of those whole rows of idiot friends who are there strictly to socialize? Who NEVER seem to sit the hell down? And who for some reason think they all have to stand up anytime there's a beer coming down the row?

Amen! Or those clowns who stand in the aisle waving while talking on their cell phone. "What do you mean you can't see me? I'm standing here blocking these people who are trying to watch a ball game!"

Quentin08
08-25-2008, 09:58 PM
Do people at Bears games yell at fans to sit down? I can't imagine that.

It seems that these people are just freakin lazy, and since they can't get off their asses, they have to ruin it for everyone else. If someone told me to sit down during a huge play, I wouldn't even pay attention to them.

Stringer
08-25-2008, 10:05 PM
As our attendence grows, our fans get worse.

I feel embarassed while the wave is going around, especially in crucial situations.

Yes!!!! I thought it was just me.

Seriously, why are people trying to get the wave going

SMH

LoveYourSuit
08-25-2008, 10:08 PM
US Cellular Field crowds have become very ignorant once we began to draw 30K per night. It sucks becasue the same things we ride at from the other park in town, I see those exact same stupid things done at our park.


I hate dealing with public, this is why IMO the Club Level is the best seat in the house.

pagansoxfan
08-26-2008, 12:18 AM
welcome to the yuppiezation of sports. blah! i went to a wolves game a few years ago, cheered after a fight. this dumb**** yelled @ me to sit down after the fight. and it seems like some of these northside lovers are invading our park. i'd blow my top if any of these morons told me to can it.
the bears had security threaten to eject rex from a practice for booing. i promise, this code of conduct they have in the nfl will make some teams go overboard. i hope i'm wrong, but i think one day, there will be a fan dress code @ sporting events. the day that happens is the day i tell pro sports to shove it.

kittle42
08-26-2008, 12:40 AM
welcome to the yuppiezation of sports. blah! i went to a wolves game a few years ago, cheered after a fight. this dumb**** yelled @ me to sit down after the fight. and it seems like some of these northside lovers are invading our park. i'd blow my top if any of these morons told me to can it.
the bears had security threaten to eject rex from a practice for booing. i promise, this code of conduct they have in the nfl will make some teams go overboard. i hope i'm wrong, but i think one day, there will be a fan dress code @ sporting events. the day that happens is the day i tell pro sports to shove it.

People used to wear suits and hats to games. Maybe we need some more civility.

LoveYourSuit
08-26-2008, 12:47 AM
People used to wear suits and hats to games. Maybe we need some more civility.


I think just like night clubs won't let you in if you are wearing something they do not approve of, I think baseball stadiums should go the same way.

9 of 10 idiots who walk in to US Cellular with a Cub hat or shirt are looking to get punched in the mouth. Security should avoid the problem and make them either remove the gear or not come in. And if you are found wearing the gear past security, ask them to remove it or throw them out. Same goes to Sox fans going to Wrigley or even Red Sox fans going to the Cell on non Red Sox games. Only colors of the teams playing on the field that day should be allowed.

hose
08-26-2008, 06:42 AM
The rube that buys a round and stands to get his wallet out. He will pass along the beers,pay the beer vendor, put the change back in wallet.

Multiply this by 5-7 times during the game with a different person in the group standing up .

:angry:

gosox3072
08-26-2008, 09:19 AM
I cant wait for playoff baseball when you stand for just about EVERY atbat

itsnotrequired
08-26-2008, 09:20 AM
People used to wear suits and hats to games. Maybe we need some more civility.

I wear a dress shirt and tie to games on the regular. Chips (RIP) has been known to wear three piece suits to games.

Obviously, we are awesome.

Frontman
08-26-2008, 09:26 AM
Sadly, I see this happen all the time at games. Even when fans are standing during a runner on third situation or something like that, somebody yells "Down in front."

It's embarrassing.

And if I'm sitting in the same section, I yell back; "Nah, he isn't with me!"

:D:

I can see if a guy keeps standing, but if its a pop up out of the seat during an exciting play; we all need to relax and have a bit of fun. The best way to actually "see" a game is to watch it on tv. At the ballpark, the fun of going to a game is also the live-action experience. With that, we get both good and bad experiences.

Marqhead
08-26-2008, 09:31 AM
I think just like night clubs won't let you in if you are wearing something they do not approve of, I think baseball stadiums should go the same way.

9 of 10 idiots who walk in to US Cellular with a Cub hat or shirt are looking to get punched in the mouth. Security should avoid the problem and make them either remove the gear or not come in. And if you are found wearing the gear past security, ask them to remove it or throw them out. Same goes to Sox fans going to Wrigley or even Red Sox fans going to the Cell on non Red Sox games. Only colors of the teams playing on the field that day should be allowed.

What a horrible horrible idea. Whats the point of being a fan if you can't support your team? People should learn to have some restraint so they aren't compelled to punch someone just because of the team they root for/apparrel they choose to wear.

Frontman
08-26-2008, 09:33 AM
What a horrible horrible idea. Whats the point of being a fan if you can't support your team? People should learn to have some restraint so they aren't compelled to punch someone just because of the team they root for/apparrel they choose to wear.

Agreed. That's a bit over the top of a reaction. Now, if someone shows up in Cubs gear during a Sox/anyone-other-than-the-Cubs game; then decides to PO the people around him by cheering against the Sox (or for that matter, in any ballpark) I call that "roll the dice, take your chances."

I can handle good-natured ribbing. But to waste time and money just to root against the Sox? Please. I can barely afford to take and go to the Cell to cheer on the Sox. Like I'd waste my time and money going to Wrigley.

Chez
08-26-2008, 09:39 AM
I see no problem with standing at a game for any reason so long as it pertains to the action on the field. On those rare occasions when I've been asked to sit down when cheering during an exciting part of a game, my standard line is to politely point out that, "this is a ballgame, not the opera." Usually works.

kittle42
08-26-2008, 10:33 AM
I think just like night clubs won't let you in if you are wearing something they do not approve of, I think baseball stadiums should go the same way.

I once got asked to turn a t-shirt inside out at a Cardinals game.

9 of 10 idiots who walk in to US Cellular with a Cub hat or shirt are looking to get punched in the mouth. Security should avoid the problem and make them either remove the gear or not come in.

Actually, I'll disagree with you here. The problem is the idiots who think it's a measured response to punch someone in the mouth because of what sports team's gear they choose to wear. Those people are far, far, far more stupid than the people wearing the gear.

LoveYourSuit
08-26-2008, 10:47 AM
What a horrible horrible idea. Whats the point of being a fan if you can't support your team? People should learn to have some restraint so they aren't compelled to punch someone just because of the team they root for/apparrel they choose to wear.


How the **** would you be "supporting your team" when your team is NOT the one playing on that field that night?


Countless times the idiots wearing Cub gear at a non Cub/Sox game are punk hoodlums just looking for trobule in addition to not controlling their alcahol. Those are the people you do not let in there with the Colors of team NOT playing on the field that night.

LoveYourSuit
08-26-2008, 10:54 AM
Actually, I'll disagree with you here. The problem is the idiots who think it's a measured response to punch someone in the mouth because of what sports team's gear they choose to wear. Those people are far, far, far more stupid than the people wearing the gear.


I agree with you if that Cub fan was an 80 yr old person who is just there to watch a baseball game and enjoy the night. But like I said, 90% of the people are not there to enjoy the night. Instead they are there to start trouble and talk trash about the Sox which is what causes fights.

THERE IS NO POINT IN WEARING CUB COLORS TO A WHITE SOX VS ANGELS GAME AT US CELLULAR............ PERIOD

Same goes to Sox fans going to Wrigley for a casual Cubs vs Pirates game.

twentywontowin
08-26-2008, 11:07 AM
Do people at Bears games yell at fans to sit down? I can't imagine that.



I once had a family of four in front of us at a Bears game, and the mother turned around and told me to watch my language.

I told her I would when the other 67,000 other people do as well. Children have no place at a Bears game.

kittle42
08-26-2008, 11:09 AM
I agree with you if that Cub fan was an 80 yr old person who is just there to watch a baseball game and enjoy the night. But like I said, 90% of the people are not there to enjoy the night. Instead they are there to start trouble and talk trash about the Sox which is what causes fights.

Nevertheless, a far stupider response to the stupid move of coming decked out in Cubs gear and talking trash is to respond to such trash with flying fists. Fighting, generally, is for idiots.

THERE IS NO POINT IN WEARING CUB COLORS TO A WHITE SOX VS ANGELS GAME AT US CELLULAR............ PERIOD

Same goes to Sox fans going to Wrigley for a casual Cubs vs Pirates game.

I wear my Sox cap or shirt to pretty much any baseball game I ever attend. I really don't see the issue, though I understand that others think it is dumb.

Lundind1
08-26-2008, 11:11 AM
I have a few thoughts. If people agree or disagree that is fine, please don't dislike me for it.

1.) Unless you are wearing something for/from one of the teams playing, just dress normal. I went to Milwaukee last year to see them play the Pads, and I just dressed in normal street clothes. Didn't really cheer for any team in particular, just went to enjoy the game and a wonderful ballpark. I would never, ever think of going into Wrigley or any other stadium with my Sox gear on, unless they were playing each other. I just find it to be rather disrespectful.

2.) If you do go to another city to watch your team play, don't be a jag. I just think that this is a good idea seeing as how there are a lot more of them than you if you want to be disrespectful and run your suck. I liken it to a batter showing up a pitcher, just not a sportsman like thing to do. I do think that you should support your team, but be respectful to your hosts.

3.) I think that if it is a huge blowout here at the cell for the Sox, just watch the 3 final outs. You don't have to stand and act like an ass, but do support your team. If the game is really close, 4 run lead or less either way, then that is great to stand...but cheer when you are doing so.

4.) If someone hits a homerun, stand and cheer as soon as you realize it is going out. If someone gets a big hit, stand and cheer. Don't just stand and cheer for something routine.

5.) Don't hang over the railings in the upperdeck. I know that they screwed up when they put those railings right at eye level in the first row, but there is a way to sit and watch the game without messing up the view of those a few rows behind you. (I am in a good row right behind home and some guys were litterally hanging over the rail from the get-go. When I asked them politely to move back just a little, they told me to F-off. They were not the season ticket holders, the holder is a guy which I do know and I mentioned it to him....he told me it was his idiot brother and he would take care of it.) It is just a mater of courtesy. I understand leaning forward to see, but not all the way over.

6.) Little movement during play. I understand emergencies but sometimes it is ridiculous. I love the fact that at the United Center, they have the ushers who do their jobs with stop signs. If the play is going on, wait for a break in the action. Most people observe this and with many breaks in the action in baseball, this is not hard to follow. There is the gap between batters, innings, pitching changes, etc. that will allow you to get to your seats without messing with other peoples views.

It has been well documented that people's opinions differ with these things. I am really down the middle with everyone's ideas. I really try hard when I am at games to act in a way that is a reflection of the classiness of the team, the park, and our city. I have also noticed that people pay a lot of money for these tickets and it should be enjoyable for all.

As for the wave: :mad:, seriously.....the game was on the line and it was distracting as hell Saturday.

Don't touch a ball in play, we have had problems with that as of late as well. If the ump is running down the line at you and points to the field, for god sakes......don't touch the ball. I think that I heard one of the announcers say that cost us and extra base.

Sorry about the long post, just some things that I have noticed over going to 55 games this year at home

kobo
08-26-2008, 11:17 AM
I agree with you if that Cub fan was an 80 yr old person who is just there to watch a baseball game and enjoy the night. But like I said, 90% of the people are not there to enjoy the night. Instead they are there to start trouble and talk trash about the Sox which is what causes fights.

THERE IS NO POINT IN WEARING CUB COLORS TO A WHITE SOX VS ANGELS GAME AT US CELLULAR............ PERIOD

Same goes to Sox fans going to Wrigley for a casual Cubs vs Pirates game.
I think your 90% argument is a bit wrong. If someone wants to come to the Cell dressed in Cubbie gear when the Cubs aren't playing there I have no problem with that. I was at the game on Saturday and saw a few people get off the L wearing Cubs hats or jerseys. I asked one of the guys why he was wearing his Fukudome jersey to the game and he said he was going to the game because he liked baseball and couldn't get a ticket to the Cubs game. He wanted to support his team though and said he wasn't going to bash the Sox or root against them, he just wanted to see the game.

A couple friends of mine who are Cubs fans have come to a couple games with me this year because they like the park and they like baseball. There has even been talk of them going in on season tickets because they won't ever be able to get them through the Cubs. Am I supposed to not let them do this because they might wear Cubs gear to a Sox game?

This sounds an awful lot like that episode of Seinfeld where Elaine wears her Orioles hat to a Yankees game and is sitting in the Owners box and is asked to remove her hat. As long as you are not acting like an idiot I could care less what anyone wears to the ballpark.

LoveYourSuit
08-26-2008, 11:18 AM
Don't touch a ball in play, we have had problems with that as of late as well. If the ump is running down the line at you and points to the field, for god sakes......don't touch the ball. I think that I heard one of the announcers say that cost us and extra base.



Talk about wanting to punch someone in the mouth, when I see grown men reach over for a $6 baseball when in play ..... *** :angry:

Lundind1
08-26-2008, 11:20 AM
I think your 90% argument is a bit wrong. If someone wants to come to the Cell dressed in Cubbie gear when the Cubs aren't playing there I have no problem with that. I was at the game on Saturday and saw a few people get off the L wearing Cubs hats or jerseys. I asked one of the guys why he was wearing his Fukudome jersey to the game and he said he was going to the game because he liked baseball and couldn't get a ticket to the Cubs game. He wanted to support his team though and said he wasn't going to bash the Sox or root against them, he just wanted to see the game.

A couple friends of mine who are Cubs fans have come to a couple games with me this year because they like the park and they like baseball. There has even been talk of them going in on season tickets because they won't ever be able to get them through the Cubs. Am I supposed to not let them do this because they might wear Cubs gear to a Sox game?

This sounds an awful lot like that episode of Seinfeld where Elaine wears her Orioles hat to a Yankees game and is sitting in the Owners box and is asked to remove her hat. As long as you are not acting like an idiot I could care less what anyone wears to the ballpark.

Again, I do stick to my statement, but I can see that this a discussion that will never have a quick answer to. I understand both sides of the debate here.

Lundind1
08-26-2008, 11:23 AM
Talk about wanting to punch someone in the mouth, when I see grown men reach over for a $6 baseball when in play ..... *** :angry:

See, violence is not the answer, just throw a piece of pizza at them. Google: Red sox fan hit with pizza. LOL. At Fenway, that is an expensive grenade the guy got hit with.

Max Power
08-26-2008, 12:46 PM
This sounds an awful lot like that episode of Seinfeld where Elaine wears her Orioles hat to a Yankees game and is sitting in the Owners box and is asked to remove her hat. As long as you are not acting like an idiot I could care less what anyone wears to the ballpark.

Not quite, as the Yankees were playing the Orioles in that episode. Though I mostly agree with the rest of what you said. It's people's behavior, not what they're wearing, that is the problem. When I go to Cub games I just wear street clothes and don't cheer for either team, but that's just me.

2906
08-26-2008, 01:00 PM
This is one reason why I've cut down significantly on the number of games I've gone to this year. People standing up in front of you all the time like they think they're the only ones in the park. Too many people who apparently think the game on the field is secondary to everything else going on. People who should be watching the game in a bar instead of at the park. The increase in the number of inconsiderate morons each year at the park is staggering.

I'm right there with you.

I would rather spend the same amount of money, go to less games, but sit in the Club seats. Maybe it's just my own viewpoint but there seems to be a lot less "issues" there.

2906
08-26-2008, 01:06 PM
I once had a family of four in front of us at a Bears game, and the mother turned around and told me to watch my language.

I told her I would when the other 67,000 other people do as well. Children have no place at a Bears game.

If you were continually using profanity, the woman was right and you were wrong.

In general, I think people understand "hey, it's a sporting event, a bad word or two might slip out". But if it's an ongoing barrage of profanity, sorry, she's right. She could have gone for an usher or security and they'd tell you the same thing.

I agree with you in one sense, and that is large raucous sporting events are probably not the best place to take kids. But to say kids shouldn't be at a Bears game is ridiculous. I don't have kids so it's not a personal issue with me. But kids have been going to Bears games since 1921 and they have every right to be there, and held to a standard of conduct just like you should be. I believe there's a code of conduct for Soldier Field, maybe it's even printed on the ticket? Not sure.

soltrain21
08-26-2008, 01:21 PM
I once had a family of four in front of us at a Bears game, and the mother turned around and told me to watch my language.

I told her I would when the other 67,000 other people do as well. Children have no place at a Bears game.


You really think she was in the wrong? Ok, buddy.

Eddo144
08-26-2008, 01:34 PM
How the **** would you be "supporting your team" when your team is NOT the one playing on that field that night?


Countless times the idiots wearing Cub gear at a non Cub/Sox game are punk hoodlums just looking for trobule in addition to not controlling their alcahol. Those are the people you do not let in there with the Colors of team NOT playing on the field that night.
So I take it you never wear White Sox gear (hat or clothing) unless you're physically at or on your way to or from a Sox game? Just yesterday, I was wearing a White Sox t-shirt on the way to Jewel. If I had run into a friend who had an extra Cubs ticket, I would have taken it; would I have deserved to be punched in the face?

Yes, many of us Sox fans hate the Cubs, and many Cub fans hate the Sox. That doesn't mean they're looking for trouble. I know I'm not looking for trouble when I wear Sox stuff.

Eddo144
08-26-2008, 01:38 PM
If you were continually using profanity, the woman was right and you were wrong.

In general, I think people understand "hey, it's a sporting event, a bad word or two might slip out". But if it's an ongoing barrage of profanity, sorry, she's right. She could have gone for an usher or security and they'd tell you the same thing.

I agree with you in one sense, and that is large raucous sporting events are probably not the best place to take kids. But to say kids shouldn't be at a Bears game is ridiculous. I don't have kids so it's not a personal issue with me. But kids have been going to Bears games since 1921 and they have every right to be there, and held to a standard of conduct just like you should be. I believe there's a code of conduct for Soldier Field, maybe it's even printed on the ticket? Not sure.
I agree with you, but it's a very fine line.

First of all, I try not to swear too much in a public setting, but when something bad happens, I will tend to curse. If someone sitting near me asked me politely to stop, I would respond, "I'll try" and actually make an effort. I make no promise, though.

Basically, I'd react in the same manner if someone said to me "please, you're in my seat" or "do you know what time it is?" or "you're sitting on my coat, could you please slide over". Don't fly off the handle either way, understand that some people are looking for a different experience than you are.

But for those people who take small children to a sporting even and don't anticipate the kids being exposed to profanity, it's time to learn how the real world works. If you really want your kids to have a squeaky-clean upbringing, don't take them to places where large groups of people have the opportunity to express passion and consume alcohol.

twentywontowin
08-26-2008, 01:39 PM
You really think she was in the wrong? Ok, buddy.

By no means did I go off on a profanity-laced tirade. And I don't really consider saying "son of a bitch" bad profanity.

And I have enough common sense to know that if you don't want little Susie and Billy to hear bad language, you don't bring them to an NFL football game, especially the Bears.

2906
08-26-2008, 01:52 PM
But for those people who take small children to a sporting even and don't anticipate the kids being exposed to profanity, it's time to learn how the real world works. If you really want your kids to have a squeaky-clean upbringing, don't take them to places where large groups of people have the opportunity to express passion and consume alcohol.

Totally agree. Big crowd, beer, passions ... things are gonna happen, things will get said. Like you said, there's a line. Most people on either side of the issue will understand roughly where that line is and not overreact either way.

I_Liked_Manuel
08-26-2008, 01:56 PM
... a double by Cabrera yesterday, and the guy behind me complained that I was blocking his view. He said, "It's okay to stand up for a home run, but not a double." :?:

I had never heard anything like that from the Behavior Police before, and I told him I'd decide when to stand up and cheer, and he took umbrage at that. It didn't get nasty, partly because I didn't continue the argument, but geez I wasn't being a Jack in the Box bouncing up and down constantly, just cheering for something good by the Sox.

The irony is that throughout the game, people in my row, the one behind and the ones in front of us were getting up and returning in the middle of plays, and he never complained about that. To top it off, he and his friend left in the 8th inning after one said to the other, "Let's stand up to watch the rest of the game."

I don't like it when people get up in the middle of an at bat, but I figure it's part of being at the game, so deal with it. Can't we all just get along?

You're only looking at this from your perspective - you're not louder when you stand up, nor are you a bigger fan - all you're doing is blocking the view of those behind you.

You know who stands up to cheer a double? Cub fans.

jdm2662
08-26-2008, 01:59 PM
By no means did I go off on a profanity-laced tirade. And I don't really consider saying "son of a bitch" bad profanity.

And I have enough common sense to know that if you don't want little Susie and Billy to hear bad language, you don't bring them to an NFL football game, especially the Bears.

I would never bring a kid under 10 to a Bears/NFL game, and swearing is probably at the bottom of the list. It's just not an atmosphere that's family friendly.

KenBerryGrab
08-26-2008, 02:03 PM
I would never bring a kid under 10 to a Bears/NFL game, and swearing is probably at the bottom of the list. It's just not an atmosphere that's family friendly.

Which is Exhibit 4A in why baseball is better than football.

Konerko05
08-26-2008, 02:05 PM
3.) I think that if it is a huge blowout here at the cell for the Sox, just watch the 3 final outs. You don't have to stand and act like an ass, but do support your team. If the game is really close, 4 run lead or less either way, then that is great to stand...but cheer when you are doing so.


Ok since I originally posted about this subject matter, I feel obligated to respond.

I don't understand the problem with standing up for the last out of the game regardless of the score. Why is simply standing up and cheering considered acting "like an ass"?

I find it pretty lame for the whole entire stadium to be sitting for the final out. You are not only cheering for the final out, but you are giving one last ovation for your team's effort over the entire night. Not to mention, everyone is going to stand as soon as the final out is recorded anyways.

Rules of how many runs your team has to be up before standing for the final out is silly.

CashMan
08-26-2008, 02:06 PM
You know who stands up to cheer a double? Cub fans.

LOL, I like that!

LoveYourSuit
08-26-2008, 02:10 PM
So I take it you never wear White Sox gear (hat or clothing) unless you're physically at or on your way to or from a Sox game? Just yesterday, I was wearing a White Sox t-shirt on the way to Jewel. If I had run into a friend who had an extra Cubs ticket, I would have taken it; would I have deserved to be punched in the face?

Yes, many of us Sox fans hate the Cubs, and many Cub fans hate the Sox. That doesn't mean they're looking for trouble. I know I'm not looking for trouble when I wear Sox stuff.


Wrong.

I wear Sox gear anytime I'm out, shopping , workout, etc.

What I don't do is disrespect another baseball stadium crowd be wearing Sox gear when the Sox are not playing in that game. Sporting events are very heated and tempers are high, the last thing I want to do is look for trouble.

Konerko05
08-26-2008, 02:14 PM
When I go to Wrigley, I wear a black shirt and a Sox hat. This isn't because I am being an *******, it is because that is basically my everyday casual wardrobe. I always wear a Sox hat, and I'm not going to go out and buy a different color shirt to go to Wrigley.

CashMan
08-26-2008, 02:26 PM
When I go to Wrigley, I wear a black shirt and a Sox hat. This isn't because I am being an *******, it is because that is basically my everyday casual wardrobe. I always wear a Sox hat, and I'm not going to go out and buy a different color shirt to go to Wrigley.

What possess you to go there?

kittle42
08-26-2008, 02:26 PM
Wrong.

I wear Sox gear anytime I'm out, shopping , workout, etc.

What I don't do is disrespect another baseball stadium crowd be wearing Sox gear when the Sox are not playing in that game. Sporting events are very heated and tempers are high, the last thing I want to do is look for trouble.

Too many people are worried about whether they are being "disrespected" these days. This whole "not in our house" mentality is complete bull**** that has simply been carried down from the players to the fans.

If someone at Wrigley wants to punch me because I am wearing a Sox shirt to a game there not involving the Sox, let them, and I will happily see them (1) in jail, and (2) in court.

kittle42
08-26-2008, 02:27 PM
What possess you to go there?

For the same reason half the other people are there - to have a good time.

Konerko05
08-26-2008, 02:28 PM
What possess you to go there?

I have many friends and family members who are Cub fans. I'll go there to watch a game a couple times a year. I've never experienced any problems there, besides smelling like urine when I leave.

soltrain21
08-26-2008, 02:38 PM
What possess you to go there?

Are you that uncomfortable with being a Sox fan that you can't "dare" head over to Wrigley to watch baseball?

Nellie_Fox
08-26-2008, 02:42 PM
Are you that uncomfortable with being a Sox fan that you can't "dare" head over to Wrigley to watch baseball?Where did that connection come from? How is not wanting to help support the Cubs, absolute rivals for the baseball dollar, evidence of being "uncomfortable" with being a Sox fan? Completely illogical.

CashMan
08-26-2008, 02:45 PM
Are you that uncomfortable with being a Sox fan that you can't "dare" head over to Wrigley to watch baseball?

It is a place I WILL NOT go to. I have my reasons.

soltrain21
08-26-2008, 02:47 PM
Where did that connection come from? How is not wanting to help support the Cubs, absolute rivals for the baseball dollar, evidence of being "uncomfortable" with being a Sox fan? Completely illogical.

Because, and it happens here all the time, a lot of people are more concerned with hating the Cubs than actually liking the White Sox.

Konerko05
08-26-2008, 02:50 PM
Where did that connection come from? How is not wanting to help support the Cubs, absolute rivals for the baseball dollar, evidence of being "uncomfortable" with being a Sox fan? Completely illogical.

You make it sound so serious. As if Sox fans are traitors if they step foot in Wrigley. Both of my brothers are Cubs fans. If they invite me to a Cubs game, I'm not going to refuse.

CashMan
08-26-2008, 02:52 PM
You make it sound so serious. As if Sox fans are traitors if they step foot in Wrigley. Both of my brothers are Cubs fans. If they invite me to a Cubs game, I'm not going to refuse.

It is serious!!!!!! You are either with us, or against us!

Konerko05
08-26-2008, 02:53 PM
It is serious!!!!!! You are either with us, or against us!

Alright, I choose Wrigley.

Bye everyone.

Marqhead
08-26-2008, 02:54 PM
You make it sound so serious. As if Sox fans are traitors if they step foot in Wrigley. Both of my brothers are Cubs fans. If they invite me to a Cubs game, I'm not going to refuse.
Same here. I hate Wrigley as much as the next guy, but I love baseball. If I'm invited to any sporting venue, chances are I'm going to go. I don't actively root against the Cubs (only in my mind) unless they are playing the Sox.

I don't see what the big deal is about going to a baseball game on the other side of town. (Of course I would never pay for the tickets/food in the ballpark)

Nellie_Fox
08-26-2008, 02:55 PM
Because, and it happens here all the time, a lot of people are more concerned with hating the Cubs than actually liking the White Sox.I can make hating the Cubs secondary to liking the Sox and still refuse to help support the Cubs.

You make it sound so serious. As if Sox fans are traitors if they step foot in Wrigley. Both of my brothers are Cubs fans. If they invite me to a Cubs game, I'm not going to refuse.I have refused invitations to Cubs games from family members.

LoveYourSuit
08-26-2008, 03:00 PM
Too many people are worried about whether they are being "disrespected" these days. This whole "not in our house" mentality is complete bull**** that has simply been carried down from the players to the fans.

If someone at Wrigley wants to punch me because I am wearing a Sox shirt to a game there not involving the Sox, let them, and I will happily see them (1) in jail, and (2) in court.


But if you can avoid dealing with stupid people and not getting into any altercations to begin with, why not wear something else?

kittle42
08-26-2008, 03:07 PM
But if you can avoid dealing with stupid people and not getting into any altercations to begin with, why not wear something else?

I wear what I want. I tend to be a smartass, especially if someone else starts the banter first, and I have never, ever gotten into an altercation. I refuse to modify what I want to do because I may run afoul of a Neanderthal.

2906
08-26-2008, 03:47 PM
I wear what I want. I tend to be a smartass, especially if someone else starts the banter first, and I have never, ever gotten into an altercation. I refuse to modify what I want to do because I may run afoul of a Neanderthal.

I admire your principles but I would also say, consider yourself lucky.

People don't realize they make themselves targets for the stupid people out there.

Long ago my dad told me hey, you can wear your Chicago stuff into someone else's field/rink/stadium, but understand one thing, there are people who will take it too seriously. It's better not to make yourself a potential target.

I always took that advice to heart.

kittle42
08-26-2008, 03:57 PM
I admire your principles but I would also say, consider yourself lucky.

People don't realize they make themselves targets for the stupid people out there.

Long ago my dad told me hey, you can wear your Chicago stuff into someone else's field/rink/stadium, but understand one thing, there are people who will take it too seriously. It's better not to make yourself a potential target.

I always took that advice to heart.

I don't disagree, and maybe one day I'll regret it, but I'll keep riding the streak til it ends.

2906
08-26-2008, 04:04 PM
I don't disagree, and maybe one day I'll regret it, but I'll keep riding the streak til it ends.

Yeah, you know, it's funny when you're on the road.

We used to do a baseball trip every year. My dad, uncle, cousin, and me. We did it for 11 years until my uncle became afflicted with Alzheimers. Anyway, my cousin was the only one who'd wear Sox stuff on the road. Not a big deal, he is a great guy and can diffuse just about any potentially bad situation.

We encountered a group of guys in a Toronto of all places and we were bantering about Chicago and Toronto, a really nice conversation about the cities, the sports teams, etc. One guy suddenly turned contentious and started giving my cousin major crap about his White Sox cap and physically knocked it off his head.

It almost got ugly even though we were trying to walk away from this guy, who kept persisting, until luckily security walked by.

Stuff like that happens, and I respect anyone's decision to wear whatever they want, but I won't. When I go to someone else's city or ballpark or whatever, I'm in the minority and I try not to do anything ... anything ... that some ******* could take offense to. And very frankly, I have seen a large proportion of *******s in Wrigley Field in particular, which is why I don't go there any more and haven't for several years.

credeistheman
08-26-2008, 05:33 PM
Some of the most heated discussions that I've witnessed on this board have come from debates about cheering etiquette...

Just know that if you like to stand and cheer you'll be accused of being a drunken boor and if you prefer to sit and clap you'll be accused of being a crotchety lame-o.

So long as you're paying attention to the game you're a-okay with me.

kittle42
08-26-2008, 05:46 PM
Some of the most heated discussions that I've witnessed on this board have come from debates about cheering etiquette...

Just know that if you like to stand and cheer you'll be accused of being a drunken boor and if you prefer to sit and clap you'll be accused of being a crotchety lame-o.

So long as you're paying attention to the game you're a-okay with me.

Agreed. I think every person in the stadium seems to think he/she is the only person who knows "how to be a real fan."

Dan Mega
08-26-2008, 05:51 PM
Boo at a Cardinals home game and see what happens.

Its priceless.

kitekrazy
08-26-2008, 07:02 PM
I think as a nation we have lost all sense of civility when it comes to sports. You can't even have youth sports anymore without parents wanting to fight.

I remember having an email conversations with a writer for the Baltimore Sun for writing an article comparing Peyton Manning to Johnny U. and hearing about all the abuse he took.

Rex Grossman would be the most hated athlete in Chicago even in BIn Laden blew up the Sears Tower.

If I had a family with young children I would probably stay away from big league games and take them to the Jackhammers or Kane County Cougars.

It wasn't too long ago a Red Sox fan killed a Yankee fan.

It's gotten to the point we are not fans but gang members for a certain team. If you wear an opposing gang symbol on our turf, you are gonna pay.

Region Rat
08-27-2008, 12:51 PM
Children have no place at a Bears game.
Thats where I learned how to say "****" as in **** Green Bay:D:

...but about the standing up. I love getting pumped up at games. After just about every good hit/play I stand up to clap. But its after the play, and before the next pitch. The guy behind you just sounds like a jerkoff.

BadBobbyJenks
08-27-2008, 02:15 PM
Boo at a Cardinals home game and see what happens.

Its priceless.

Those fans are unreal. They give standing ovations to the visiting team after a great play.

soxinem1
08-28-2008, 02:23 PM
I think just like night clubs won't let you in if you are wearing something they do not approve of, I think baseball stadiums should go the same way.

9 of 10 idiots who walk in to US Cellular with a Cub hat or shirt are looking to get punched in the mouth. Security should avoid the problem and make them either remove the gear or not come in. And if you are found wearing the gear past security, ask them to remove it or throw them out. Same goes to Sox fans going to Wrigley or even Red Sox fans going to the Cell on non Red Sox games. Only colors of the teams playing on the field that day should be allowed.

I understand your reasoning, but teams including the White Sox, price according to who is playing. No point in rivalries if you can't support your team.

Plus, unless the wording is vulgar, good luck enforcing it, legally too.

Plus, plus, some ********s hight get the tidea to promote hundreds and thousands to come out wearing the banned items. Could you imagine that headache?

kittle42
08-28-2008, 02:53 PM
Plus, unless the wording is vulgar, good luck enforcing it, legally too.

Why?

Some people have quite a misconception over when/where free speech is totally free.

Nellie_Fox
08-28-2008, 02:55 PM
Why?

Some people have quite a misconception over when/where free speech is totally free.Yes. You might have a right to wear a certain t-shirt, protected by the First Amendment, but I don't have to let you come into my house or place of business wearing it. The Bill of Rights governs your relationship with the government, not with other citizens.

kittle42
08-28-2008, 03:29 PM
Yes. You might have a right to wear a certain t-shirt, protected by the First Amendment, but I don't have to let you come into my house or place of business wearing it. The Bill of Rights governs your relationship with the government, not with other citizens.

I always chuckle when people are moaning about free speech in the workplace or at places of business.

doublem23
08-28-2008, 03:35 PM
Yes. You might have a right to wear a certain t-shirt, protected by the First Amendment, but I don't have to let you come into my house or place of business wearing it. The Bill of Rights governs your relationship with the government, not with other citizens.

True, but U.S. Cellular Field is not privately owned.

Gavin
08-28-2008, 03:41 PM
Are you guys really suggesting that they should censor what team apparel is allowed to be worn in UCSF?

Why stop there, amirite...

doublem23
08-28-2008, 03:49 PM
Are you guys really suggesting that they should censor what team apparel is allowed to be worn in UCSF?

Why stop there, amirite...

1 person's post certainly qualifies as "you guys."

:rolleyes:

Gavin
08-28-2008, 03:52 PM
1 person's post certainly qualifies as "you guys."

:rolleyes:

I count one advocating it and the other laughing at arguments for free speech. So yeah, 1 person and his legal adviser equals two.

:rolleyes::rolleyes:

doublem23
08-28-2008, 04:01 PM
I count one advocating it and the other laughing at arguments for free speech. So yeah, 1 person and his legal adviser equals two.

Well, you've certainly found the pulse of the our 11,000 registered members.

:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

kittle42
08-28-2008, 04:05 PM
I count one advocating it and the other laughing at arguments for free speech. So yeah, 1 person and his legal adviser equals two.

:rolleyes::rolleyes:

All Nellie and I were stating is that they have a right to "censor" if they want to. I don't think either of us would advocate that it is a good move for the Sox, or that we would want them to do such a thing.

I must admit, I am guilty of this, too - but there is such a rush to jump down another poster's throat around here sometimes that I think people don't actually read and think about posts before firing back as quickly as they can.

Gavin
08-28-2008, 04:05 PM
Let's just put one of these (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:First_amendment_zone2.jpg) into sections 506-509 for Red Sox/Cubs fans. Problem solved.

doublem23
08-28-2008, 04:10 PM
Let's just put one of these (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:First_amendment_zone2.jpg) into sections 506-509 for Red Sox/Cubs fans. Problem solved.

This would work far better (http://www.rogerwendell.com/images/pikespeak/1498.jpg).

:thumbsup:

Nellie_Fox
08-28-2008, 11:32 PM
True, but U.S. Cellular Field is not privately owned.If you rent an apartment, you have the same rights to exclude people as you would if you owned it. In fact, you have the same rights in a hotel room, which is essentially a one-night rental.

The Sox rent the facility.

fed ex 4 pasqua
08-29-2008, 12:03 AM
Censorship (http://gothamist.com/2008/08/27/did_police_eject_a_man_from_yankee.php) is Un-American.

kittle42
08-29-2008, 12:27 AM
Censorship (http://gothamist.com/2008/08/27/did_police_eject_a_man_from_yankee.php) is Un-American.

He should have peed in his beer cup, obviously.

LoveYourSuit
08-29-2008, 12:29 AM
Are you guys really suggesting that they should censor what team apparel is allowed to be worn in UCSF?

Why stop there, amirite...


I suggested this because of the amount of problems I have witnessed at US Cellular field whenever a moron shows up there wearing a Cub jersey and the Sox are playing the Royals :rolleyes:. Makes no sense and in reality this person is asking for trouble. A fight after 10 beers later that night can be avoided if Security at the door would ask this person to return the jersey to the car and wear something else. It's the reality how dumb society has become that we might have to go there one day.

The Sox have the right to enforce such a rule.

doublem23
08-29-2008, 12:34 AM
If you rent an apartment, you have the same rights to exclude people as you would if you owned it. In fact, you have the same rights in a hotel room, which is essentially a one-night rental.

The Sox rent the facility.

But an apartment building or a hotel is still private property. U.S. Cellular Field is technically public, since it is owned by the State of Illinois through IFSA.

I'm not trying to play internet lawyer, my knowledge of this subject is only limited to the couple of pre-Law classes I took at Bradley, but in many of these 1st Amendment cases, one of the key elements is the distinction between public and private property. The Cell is not private property, therefore I think you'd at least run into some legal problems if you tried to keep people out of the park for their attire; at least more than you would at Wrigley Field, which is privately owned by the Tribune Co.

Am I right or am I way off base? :dunno: Kittle? DumpJerry? Any of the other lawyers that we have floating around this site?

kittle42
08-29-2008, 12:41 AM
I suggested this because of the amount of problems I have witnessed at US Cellular field whenever a moron shows up there wearing a Cub jersey and the Sox are playing the Royals :rolleyes:. Makes no sense and in reality this person is asking for trouble. A fight after 10 beers later that night can be avoided if Security at the door would ask this person to return the jersey to the car and wear something else. It's the reality how dumb society has become that we might have to go there one day.

The Sox have the right to enforce such a rule.

They do have the right, but I certainly don't think they should do it.

kittle42
08-29-2008, 12:42 AM
But an apartment building or a hotel is still private property. U.S. Cellular Field is technically public, since it is owned by the State of Illinois through IFSA.

I'm not trying to play internet lawyer, my knowledge of this subject is only limited to the couple of pre-Law classes I took at Bradley, but in many of these 1st Amendment cases, one of the key elements is the distinction between public and private property. The Cell is not private property, therefore I think you'd at least run into some legal problems if you tried to keep people out of the park for their attire; at least more than you would at Wrigley Field, which is privately owned by the Tribune Co.

Am I right or am I way off base? :dunno: Kittle? DumpJerry? Any of the other lawyers that we have floating around this site?

Nellie's right, but I like the argument!

LoveYourSuit
08-29-2008, 12:56 AM
But an apartment building or a hotel is still private property. U.S. Cellular Field is technically public, since it is owned by the State of Illinois through IFSA.

I'm not trying to play internet lawyer, my knowledge of this subject is only limited to the couple of pre-Law classes I took at Bradley, but in many of these 1st Amendment cases, one of the key elements is the distinction between public and private property. The Cell is not private property, therefore I think you'd at least run into some legal problems if you tried to keep people out of the park for their attire; at least more than you would at Wrigley Field, which is privately owned by the Tribune Co.

Am I right or am I way off base? :dunno: Kittle? DumpJerry? Any of the other lawyers that we have floating around this site?

I think US Cellular Field is private property regardless of state ownership or not. It is a place of business for a business known as "The Chicago White Sox," therefore the Sox call all the shots whenever a "White Sox" event is held there. The same goes for the Chicago Bears who I believe the Chicago Park District (city/public) still owns Soldier Field.

Pear-Zin-Ski
08-29-2008, 08:40 AM
That's probably my biggest pet peeve. Why is it necessary to stand up to get your wallet out of your pocket?

What if its in your rear pocket? Still no excuse why you have to stand up during the WHOLE exchange....

Pear-Zin-Ski
08-29-2008, 08:50 AM
I was at the back-to-back-to-back-to-back HR game and after the 4th one was hit me and 3 friends were standing up cheering. Apparently the guy a few rows back thought we stood a little too long and asked us to sit down. Other people were still standing around us.

You just witnessed baseball history! Now sit down!

Why is there a science as to when you should cheer and when you should sit down...its called common sense...unfortunately I guess some folks at the Cell dont have or can't tollerate it....

Pear-Zin-Ski
08-29-2008, 09:03 AM
You're only looking at this from your perspective - you're not louder when you stand up, nor are you a bigger fan - all you're doing is blocking the view of those behind you.

You know who stands up to cheer a double? Cub fans.

This may be the guy who told you to sit down....

Pear-Zin-Ski
08-29-2008, 09:08 AM
Boo at a Cardinals home game and see what happens.

Its priceless.

St. Louis is a wonderful place to have that type of ****....