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View Full Version : The night Wrigley almost blew away


Fenway
08-12-2008, 12:24 PM
Here you go...Cubs fans at their finest

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turners56
08-12-2008, 12:27 PM
Those are some fast moving clouds. Yet, the people still just sat there going "OMG".

Law11
08-12-2008, 12:39 PM
The difference between the bleacher evac and the box seat evac is like night and day.

Singing and goofin around to silence and awestruck at the storm.

thomas35forever
08-12-2008, 04:00 PM
In spite of what was going on, that footage is pretty amazing. A night that will live in Wrigley folklore, and I'm sure every Cubs fan will tell you they were there when in reality, only 40,000 were.

october23sp
08-12-2008, 04:32 PM
Those clouds look eerie as hell.

peeonwrigley
08-12-2008, 04:42 PM
I live about a mile south of the dump, that storm was some scary ****.

DumpJerry
08-12-2008, 05:22 PM
Those clouds look eerie as hell.
That night was as close to Armageddon as anyone would want to be. According to the Weather Service, the number of lightning strikes that night in four hours was the number we usually get in SIX MONTHS.:o:

SoxandtheCityTee
08-12-2008, 05:37 PM
And Skilling said that the percentage of postively charged lightning to negatively, usually 10/ 90, was reversed, so that 90% of the lightning was positively charged. Which is the more dangerous kind, if I got this correctly.

A storm that violent, that long, that close to the lakefront is very rare. I was amazed. Winds at 70 mph at the pumping crib a couple miles offshore. :o:

Fenway
08-12-2008, 05:42 PM
more video

http://www.myfoxchicago.com/myfox/pages/Home/Detail?contentId=7139778&version=3&locale=EN-US&layoutCode=TSTY&pageId=1.1.1

DumpJerry
08-12-2008, 05:44 PM
And Skilling said that the percentage of postively charged lightning to negatively, usually 10/ 90, was reversed, so that 90% of the lightning was positively charged. Which is the more dangerous kind, if I got this correctly.

A storm that violent, that long, that close to the lakefront is very rare. I was amazed. Winds at 70 mph at the pumping crib a couple miles offshore. :o:
The good news out of that night was no deaths. No serious injuries were reported.

Marqhead
08-12-2008, 06:29 PM
I was at that game. (Don't judge me I was invited by family and I love watching baseball. Plus they have lost 4 of the last 5 i've been to.)

It was some scary ****, hearing the sirens go off with 30K people crammed below the seatss.

WhiteSoxOnly
08-12-2008, 06:42 PM
I was at that game. (Don't judge me I was invited by family and I love watching baseball. Plus they have lost 4 of the last 5 i've been to.)

It was some scary ****, hearing the sirens go off with 30K people crammed below the seatss.

Hmmmm...you go,they lose...you need to get season tickets then :wink:

pczarapa
08-12-2008, 09:32 PM
Was this recently? Live in Lexington, we haven't seen a thunderstorm in a month.

WhiteSox5187
08-12-2008, 10:31 PM
Was this recently? Live in Lexington, we haven't seen a thunderstorm in a month.
This was last week!!!

It's nothing short of a miracle that no one got hurt. When I was an usher at Wrigley and at Comiskey we had to do a couple of drills where we simulated the evacuation of both ballparks and it took forever. The only thing I could remember thinking was "God I hope we never have to evacuate these parks." Also in the event of a tornado you are so much better off at Comiskey. There is a certain degree of shelter underneath the stadium by the clubhouse that extend all around the ball park and you can fit 40,000 people in there rather easily. At Wrigley you have to try and cram everyone into a narrow concourse that was built in 1914 and the thought of evacuation never crossed the architects mind. It did occur to the designers of Comiskey however. Thank God no one was hurt. Cool night to talk about though.

fusillirob1983
08-13-2008, 01:17 AM
Was this recently? Live in Lexington, we haven't seen a thunderstorm in a month.

I've been in Louisville most of the last month. Has the weather been that different in Lexington? There haven't been terrible storms like in Chicago last week, but I've seen some heavy downpours since I've been down here.

BRDSR
08-13-2008, 07:31 AM
And Skilling said that the percentage of postively charged lightning to negatively, usually 10/ 90, was reversed, so that 90% of the lightning was positively charged. Which is the more dangerous kind, if I got this correctly.

A storm that violent, that long, that close to the lakefront is very rare. I was amazed. Winds at 70 mph at the pumping crib a couple miles offshore. :o:

There's a "more dangerous" kind of lightning? You learn something new every day.

twinsuck1
08-13-2008, 09:46 AM
This was by far the most scared I have ever been when a storm has hit. I felt bad because I let it show a litlte and scared my little boy quite a bit. Wish i had a basement I would feel safer but I have a town home built on a slab. Best thing for us Is the Inner bathrooom on the main floor. Anyone else have this problem?

Martinigirl
08-13-2008, 11:43 AM
I am claustrophobic so all I could think of watching those clips was the panic attack I would have had. I don't know how those people weren't freaking out. I can guarantee you, the last thing I would have done is start chanting for my team.

LoveYourSuit
08-13-2008, 12:56 PM
One smart thing the Sox due on a storm with major wind gust is to bring out all their heavy field equipment to hold down the tarp. I did not see that in the cub video.

LoveYourSuit
08-13-2008, 12:57 PM
I am claustrophobic so all I could think of watching those clips was the panic attack I would have had. I don't know how those people weren't freaking out. I can guarantee you, the last thing I would have done is start chanting for my team.


Nope, they sing songs like "Go Cubs Go" to get away from their worries.

SoxandtheCityTee
08-13-2008, 02:00 PM
There's a "more dangerous" kind of lightning? You learn something new every day.

No kidding. I feel I've spent almost as many hours watching Skilling as I have watching the Sox, and I've never heard him mention it before. Apparently, positive lightning is something pilots know about, as one of its salient features -- in addition to carrying dramatically higher voltages -- is that it can strike miles away from the actual storm. So you can be cruising along in clear skies and get the proverbial "bolt out of the blue."

I did notice the huge number of strikes in that storm, like a strobe light in the sky. I was puzzled by this and the level of noise so without thinking I went over to the window to look out. :dunce: But not for long!

Foulke You
08-13-2008, 05:15 PM
Of all the buildings to be stuck at during a terrible storm I can think of no worse a place to be than Wrigley. That building is crumbling without 70 mph winds blowing on it! I also get claustrophobic in that micro concourse they have down there under normal conditions let alone having the whole park evacuate there.

pearso66
08-13-2008, 07:44 PM
This was last week!!!

It's nothing short of a miracle that no one got hurt. When I was an usher at Wrigley and at Comiskey we had to do a couple of drills where we simulated the evacuation of both ballparks and it took forever. The only thing I could remember thinking was "God I hope we never have to evacuate these parks." Also in the event of a tornado you are so much better off at Comiskey. There is a certain degree of shelter underneath the stadium by the clubhouse that extend all around the ball park and you can fit 40,000 people in there rather easily. At Wrigley you have to try and cram everyone into a narrow concourse that was built in 1914 and the thought of evacuation never crossed the architects mind. It did occur to the designers of Comiskey however. Thank God no one was hurt. Cool night to talk about though.


No wonder I didn't know what the heck was going on. I was on vacation last week, so I didn't get hit by the storm. I had heard there were tornadoes, but I didn't even think of it at a ballpark.

soxwon
08-14-2008, 07:13 PM
Was this from CLOVERFIELD?

pczarapa
08-14-2008, 08:13 PM
Of all the buildings to be stuck at during a terrible storm I can think of no worse a place to be than Wrigley. That building is crumbling without 70 mph winds blowing on it! I also get claustrophobic in that micro concourse they have down there under normal conditions let alone having the whole park evacuate there.

If it's true that urine is conductive, Wrigley would definitely be the worst place to be in a lightning storm!!!! :bandance::bandance::bandance:

mrwag
08-14-2008, 08:51 PM
If it's true that urine is conductive, Wrigley would definitely be the worst place to be in a lightning storm!!!! :bandance::bandance::bandance:

Wow - I really did laugh out loud on that comment! I'll have to remember that one!

Pods4455
08-20-2008, 06:22 PM
This was last week!!!

It's nothing short of a miracle that no one got hurt. When I was an usher at Wrigley and at Comiskey we had to do a couple of drills where we simulated the evacuation of both ballparks and it took forever. The only thing I could remember thinking was "God I hope we never have to evacuate these parks." Also in the event of a tornado you are so much better off at Comiskey. There is a certain degree of shelter underneath the stadium by the clubhouse that extend all around the ball park and you can fit 40,000 people in there rather easily. At Wrigley you have to try and cram everyone into a narrow concourse that was built in 1914 and the thought of evacuation never crossed the architects mind. It did occur to the designers of Comiskey however. Thank God no one was hurt. Cool night to talk about though.


About 5 years ago (when i was about 16) I worked a minor league stadium and we had a CRAZY tornado.. our ballpark was set up the same way as US Cellular... it was a newer ballpark and we had to "hide" in the lower concourse part that was under the stadium where the locker rooms and everything was... funny thing is that after the storm i found out on the news that the field was deemed the safest place to hide durring a tornado in the area... nice to know!:D: