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Madvora
07-25-2008, 06:14 PM
Anybody been watching this new series they have on Comcast?
It's a bunch of interviews with people from baseball and they show a lot of color film from the 30's through the 60's.

They just did a "One Hit Wonders" segment in a recent one and talked about the '59 Sox, however, one of the people they chose to interview was Mike Murphy! That's terrible.

I think it's an interesting show, but their selling point is all of this color film they have. None of it seems to interesting to me because it's too much of these 2 second shots of guys smiling in the dugout and stuff. I think they edit the pace too quick. I'd like to see some more actual game footage and some great plays and stuff like that. The interviews are pretty interesting though.

Fenway
07-26-2008, 12:07 AM
A lot of the footage was shot by players who had been given home movie cameras by Kodak. Most of the good footage was seen on HBO in the early 90's.

Game footage is rare and is mostly old newsreels shown in movie theaters.

The oldest known TV broadcast that exists is Game 1 of the 1948 World Series at Braves Field. It was found at WEWS in Cleveland. The midwest had not been connected to the east for TV yet and what was found at WEWS was a kinescope from a Boston station that was then flown to Ohio for broadcast later that day. The quality is very poor.

Madvora
07-26-2008, 12:12 AM
A lot of the footage was shot by players who had been given home movie cameras by Kodak. Most of the good footage was seen on HBO in the early 90's.

Game footage is rare and is mostly old newsreels shown in movie theaters.

The oldest known TV broadcast that exists is Game 1 of the 1948 World Series at Braves Field. It was found at WEWS in Cleveland. The midwest had not been connected to the east for TV yet and what was found at WEWS was a kinescope from a Boston station that was then flown to Ohio for broadcast later that day. The quality is very poor.
That's the thing. They said that most of it was shot by players, so obviously it's usually pregame stuff or goofing off in the dugout.
Any "baseball" stuff they show is mostly batting practice.

DSpivack
07-26-2008, 12:17 AM
A lot of the footage was shot by players who had been given home movie cameras by Kodak. Most of the good footage was seen on HBO in the early 90's.

Game footage is rare and is mostly old newsreels shown in movie theaters.

The oldest known TV broadcast that exists is Game 1 of the 1948 World Series at Braves Field. It was found at WEWS in Cleveland. The midwest had not been connected to the east for TV yet and what was found at WEWS was a kinescope from a Boston station that was then flown to Ohio for broadcast later that day. The quality is very poor.

Do you know who owns the little footage that does exist?

michned
07-26-2008, 12:39 AM
A lot of the footage was shot by players who had been given home movie cameras by Kodak. Most of the good footage was seen on HBO in the early 90's.

For those who have seen the footage on Comcast, is this the footage from "When It Was A Game?" I believe that was produced by HBO, no?

whitesox901
07-26-2008, 05:40 AM
Its been on FSN Detroit here too, I love it!

Medford Bobby
07-26-2008, 10:01 AM
For those who have seen the footage on Comcast, is this the footage from "When It Was A Game?" I believe that was produced by HBO, no?

Indeed it was from HBO. My take is that any time old baseball videos are on instead of hours of poker shootouts, all the better!!:smile:

Fenway
07-26-2008, 11:25 AM
Indeed it was from HBO. My take is that any time old baseball videos are on instead of hours of poker shootouts, all the better!!:smile:

When It Was A Game I and II is required viewing for any baseball fan.
I was blown away by the color footage of Fenway in the mid 40's and chuckled when I saw the scoreboard telling fans that the Boston Yanks would be playing the Redskins. The Boston Yanks franchise today is Indianapolis with stops in Dallas and Baltimore.

I do volunteer work for the New England Sports Museum and it is frustrating that so little game footage exists from any sport before 1970 when cheaper video tape became available.

For example only 40 seconds of the 1967 World Series survived and only because the clip was shown on the Huntley-Brinkley newscast. NBC erased 99 percent of what they had to reuse the tape.

We did find a copy of Game 7 of the 1962 NBA Finals that was done by a local Boston station and was picked up by a network owned by Howard Hughes.

The only producer from the 60's that saved everything was Goodson-Todman who did game shows. Somehow they sensed that old Password and What's My Line shows would have value 40 years later. Nobody connected to spors had that vision sadly.

TommyJohn
07-26-2008, 08:08 PM
When It Was A Game I and II is required viewing for any baseball fan.
I was blown away by the color footage of Fenway in the mid 40's and chuckled when I saw the scoreboard telling fans that the Boston Yanks would be playing the Redskins. The Boston Yanks franchise today is Indianapolis with stops in Dallas and Baltimore.

I do volunteer work for the New England Sports Museum and it is frustrating that so little game footage exists from any sport before 1970 when cheaper video tape became available.

For example only 40 seconds of the 1967 World Series survived and only because the clip was shown on the Huntley-Brinkley newscast. NBC erased 99 percent of what they had to reuse the tape.

We did find a copy of Game 7 of the 1962 NBA Finals that was done by a local Boston station and was picked up by a network owned by Howard Hughes.

The only producer from the 60's that saved everything was Goodson-Todman who did game shows. Somehow they sensed that old Password and What's My Line shows would have value 40 years later. Nobody connected to spors had that vision sadly.

Wasn't videotape back then large, bulky, and expensive to maintain? It was much cheaper to reuse the stuff, unfortunately. The same thing happened to the first 10 years of the Tonight Show. YouTube has an audio of a 46 minute interview that Johnny Carson did with Jim Garrison in 1968. It is the complete interview but, sadly, the video of it no longer exists.

Fenway
07-26-2008, 10:46 PM
Wasn't videotape back then large, bulky, and expensive to maintain? It was much cheaper to reuse the stuff, unfortunately. The same thing happened to the first 10 years of the Tonight Show. YouTube has an audio of a 46 minute interview that Johnny Carson did with Jim Garrison in 1968. It is the complete interview but, sadly, the video of it no longer exists.

Bottom line was 2 inch videotape cost $300 for a 60 minute reel.
SONY developed 3/4 inch in 1970 that became cost effective.

My Dad recorded Satchel Page in 1965 and snuck the tape out of WHDH and that tape is proudly shown at the Negro League Museum in KC.

Today the biggest problem with surviving 2 inch tape is finding workable machines to play it back. Boston has one workable machine Chicago has none.

Fenway
07-27-2008, 11:35 AM
Do you know who owns the little footage that does exist?

MLB lays claim to all old radio and TV tapes.

Last year we discovered 3 reels of tape that turned out to be the entire broadcast of a Twins-Red Sox game that was the second to last game of the 67 season. As far as we know it is the oldest surviving game that was televised in color. There were no graphics on the tape so it must have been recorded in the truck at Fenway as graphics were done back at the studio then. NESN put it on DVD as part of the salute to the 67 Red Sox.

A lot of snippets of game action from the 60's recorded by the former WHDH in Boston survived by a fluke. The station had its license revoked by the FCC in 1972 because it was owned by a newspaper and their archives were bought by WSBK.

My favorite is Tony Conigliaro's first HR in 1964 called by Curt Gowdy. WHDH recorded all their newscasts from 1962 on so the sports clips survived.

The big mystery is why game 161 was saved but not game 162 but it is possible we haven't found it yet. Nothing is labled and it is just very time consuming to transfer all these old tapes to digital media.
The sports museum has an ancient AMPEX 1200 2 inch machine which we keep alive thanks to some MIT people who make the spare parts.

One thing we were finally able to prove which was a huge turning point of the 67 season. Ken Berry was indeed out at the plate thanks to an incredible tag by Elston Howard. Berry did not hustle and it cost the White Sox dearly.

TommyJohn
07-27-2008, 01:42 PM
MLB lays claim to all old radio and TV tapes.

Last year we discovered 3 reels of tape that turned out to be the entire broadcast of a Twins-Red Sox game that was the second to last game of the 67 season. As far as we know it is the oldest surviving game that was televised in color. There were no graphics on the tape so it must have been recorded in the truck at Fenway as graphics were done back at the studio then. NESN put it on DVD as part of the salute to the 67 Red Sox.

A lot of snippets of game action from the 60's recorded by the former WHDH in Boston survived by a fluke. The station had its license revoked by the FCC in 1972 because it was owned by a newspaper and their archives were bought by WSBK.

My favorite is Tony Conigliaro's first HR in 1964 called by Curt Gowdy. WHDH recorded all their newscasts from 1962 on so the sports clips survived.

The big mystery is why game 161 was saved but not game 162 but it is possible we haven't found it yet. Nothing is labled and it is just very time consuming to transfer all these old tapes to digital media.
The sports museum has an ancient AMPEX 1200 2 inch machine which we keep alive thanks to some MIT people who make the spare parts.

One thing we were finally able to prove which was a huge turning point of the 67 season. Ken Berry was indeed out at the plate thanks to an incredible tag by Elston Howard. Berry did not hustle and it cost the White Sox dearly.

Funny how the throw by Jose Tartabull is such a legendary sports moment in Boston. It goes unmentioned in Chicago. Bob Vanderberg has a picture of Howard applying the tag in Ken Berry's entry in the book "SOX: From Lane and Fain to Zisk and Fisk" which came out in 1981. That is about it from a Chicago perspective. I didn't realize it was so fondly remembered until I saw it in a book about the 1967 Red Sox. Of course, the Right Sox finally got the Wrong Sox back in 2005. Revenge 38 years in the making, baby. OHHHHHHH NOOOOOOO! :tongue:

Now if you want to talk about the Randy Hundley-Tommie Agee play at the plate from 1969, well......take your pick of the rhapsodies, harmonies and soliloquies about that magical, mystical, ever-so-cursed moment in time.

Fenway
07-27-2008, 02:10 PM
Funny how the throw by Jose Tartabull is such a legendary sports moment in Boston. It goes unmentioned in Chicago. Bob Vanderberg has a picture of Howard applying the tag in Ken Berry's entry in the book "SOX: From Lane and Fain to Zisk and Fisk" which came out in 1981. That is about it from a Chicago perspective. I didn't realize it was so fondly remembered until I saw it in a book about the 1967 Red Sox. Of course, the Right Sox finally got the Wrong Sox back in 2005. Revenge 38 years in the making, baby. OHHHHHHH NOOOOOOO! :tongue:

Now if you want to talk about the Randy Hundley-Tommie Agee play at the plate from 1969, well......take your pick of the rhapsodies, harmonies and soliloquies about that magical, mystical, ever-so-cursed moment in time.

I think that play is remembered fondly as it was that moment that New England first believed the impossible could happen and the pennant was indeed possible.

The late Ken Coleman's call is part of folklore now...

Josephson lines to right....Tartabull has a weak arm....here comes Berry......HE IS OUT AT THE PLATE..HE IS OUT AT THE PLATE

Of course nobody in Boston remembers the White Sox won the second game as it was only on radio.

One of my favorite tapes is a complete World Series game at Ebbets Field in 1952. The announcers were Mel Allen and Red Barber.

PKalltheway
07-27-2008, 03:21 PM
One of my favorite tapes is a complete World Series game at Ebbets Field in 1952. The announcers were Mel Allen and Red Barber.
I remember they actually showed Games 6 and 7 of the 1952 World Series on ESPN Classic a few years ago. Good stuff. Of course, that was when ESPN Classic was actually showing classic games, not classic poker and bowling.