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skottyj242
07-09-2008, 12:29 PM
We get our due on how Harry Caray started the tradition at Comiskey:

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3476916

Law11
07-09-2008, 01:15 PM
http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=103125

Some great video of the ol days.

TDog
07-09-2008, 02:05 PM
Maybe it is this song and the Cubs' celebration of it that has jinxed them, the Cubs being all about jinxes and fate and such. The song was written for vaudeville in 1908 but didn't gain popularity until after the Cubs 6,210 people (an all-time record low for a postseason major league baseball game) were present for the last time to see the Cubs win a World Series championship.

As for Harry Caray, it is ironic that a man could be so linked to the songs when he (by all accounts) didn't know the words to it. He only knew the chorus. Of course, the same could be said about many White Sox fans and Na Na Hey Hey Goodbye.

TornLabrum
07-09-2008, 02:14 PM
Maybe it is this song and the Cubs' celebration of it that has jinxed them, the Cubs being all about jinxes and fate and such. The song was written for vaudeville in 1908 but didn't gain popularity until after the Cubs 6,210 people (an all-time record low for a postseason major league baseball game) were present for the last time to see the Cubs win a World Series championship.

As for Harry Caray, it is ironic that a man could be so linked to the songs when he (by all accounts) didn't know the words to it. He only knew the chorus. Of course, the same could be said about many White Sox fans and Na Na Hey Hey Goodbye.

The chorus is a part of a song whose lyrics don't change. It is usually preceded by a verse, a section with separate words and music from the chorus. In the case of TMOTTBG, there are two verses, one preceding the chorus and a second one preceding a repeat of the chorus. In fact there are two separate sets of lyrics written at different times, one in 1908, the other several years later.

You're referring to the melody. Harry knew that, although he had trouble singing it in pitch. He butchered the lyrics which are as follows (Harry's butchery corrected in caps):

Take me out to the ball game
Take me out WITH the crowd
Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack
I don't care if I NEVER get back

LET ME root, root, root for the home team [substitute White Sox]
If they don't win it's a shame
For it's one, two, three strikes you're out
At the old ball game.

TDog
07-09-2008, 02:44 PM
The chorus is a part of a song whose lyrics don't change. It is usually preceded by a verse, a section with separate words and music from the chorus. In the case of TMOTTBG, there are two verses, one preceding the chorus and a second one preceding a repeat of the chorus. In fact there are two separate sets of lyrics written at different times, one in 1908, the other several years later.

You're referring to the melody. Harry knew that, although he had trouble singing it in pitch. He butchered the lyrics which are as follows (Harry's butchery corrected in caps):

Take me out to the ball game
Take me out WITH the crowd
Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack
I don't care if I NEVER get back

LET ME root, root, root for the home team [substitute White Sox]
If they don't win it's a shame
For it's one, two, three strikes you're out
At the old ball game.

I stand corrected. I meant to state that he only knew the words to the chorus, but as you pointed out, he only came close to the words to the chorus. He didn't know the words to the verses. I doubt he knew the melody to the verses.

What has always bothered me about Cracker Jack being sold at baseball games in the 21st century is that the only reason Cracker Jack is linked to baseball is that a man who had never attended a baseball game in his life (and wouldn't see a major league baseball game for more than 20 years after he wrote the baseball anthem) needed a rhyme for "never get back."

Railsplitter
07-09-2008, 08:21 PM
If I'm not mistaken, the plea in TMOTTBG is made by a young lady named Nellie Kelly.

TornLabrum
07-09-2008, 09:30 PM
If I'm not mistaken, the plea in TMOTTBG is made by a young lady named Nellie Kelly.

The 1927 version was about Nellie Kelly. The original was about Katie Casey.

1908 Verses:

Katie Casey was base ball mad.
Had the fever and had it bad;
Just to root for the home town crew,
Ev'ry sou Katie blew.
On a Saturday, he young beau
Called to see if she'd like to go,
To see a show but Miss Kate said,
"No, I'll tell you what you can do."

(Chorus)

Katie Casey saw all the games,
Knew the players by their first names;
Told the umpire he was wrong,
All along good and strong.
When the score was just two to two,
Katie Casey knew what to do,
Just to cheer up the boys she knew,
She made the gang sing this song:

(Chorus)

1927 Version:

Nelly Kelly loved baseball games,
Knew the players, knew all their names,
You could see her there ev'ry day,
Shout "Hurray," when they'd play.
Her boy friend by the name of Joe
Said, "To Coney Isle, dear, let's go,"
Then Nelly started to fret and pout,
And to him I heard her shout.

(Chorus)

Nelly Kelly was sure some fan,
She would root just like any man,
Told the umpire he was wrong,
All along, good and strong.
When the score was just two to two,
Nelly Kelly knew what to do,
Just to cheer up the boys she knew,
She made the gang sing this song.

(Chorus)

Railsplitter
07-09-2008, 09:34 PM
I figured somebody would know, at least find the right one. Thanks, TL.

TDog
07-09-2008, 10:42 PM
The 1927 version was about Nellie Kelly. The original was about Katie Casey. ...

A novelty band that called itself Bruce Springstone (its minor hit, I believe, was a the Flintstones theme as if it were done by Bruce Springsteen) did a Srpingsteen-esqe version of Take Me Out to the Ballgame based on the 1927 verses. It beats the heck out of anything Harry Caray ever sang.

skottyj242
07-10-2008, 09:57 AM
The chorus is a part of a song whose lyrics don't change. It is usually preceded by a verse, a section with separate words and music from the chorus. In the case of TMOTTBG, there are two verses, one preceding the chorus and a second one preceding a repeat of the chorus. In fact there are two separate sets of lyrics written at different times, one in 1908, the other several years later.

You're referring to the melody. Harry knew that, although he had trouble singing it in pitch. He butchered the lyrics which are as follows (Harry's butchery corrected in caps):

Take me out to the ball game
Take me out WITH the crowd
Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack
I don't care if I NEVER get back

LET ME root, root, root for the home team [substitute White Sox]
If they don't win it's a shame
For it's one, two, three strikes you're out
At the old ball game.

One of my biggest pet peeves is when people mess up the song. Especially because they put the lyrics on the scoreboard.

FielderJones
07-10-2008, 12:35 PM
http://www.tinfoil.com/e09926~.ram

Ripped from an Edison Phonograph cylinder. Requires RealPlayer.

whitesox901
07-10-2008, 12:50 PM
the same could be said about many White Sox fans and Na Na Hey Hey Goodbye.

too be honest, I those were the only words :redface:

TornLabrum
07-10-2008, 02:55 PM
http://www.tinfoil.com/e09926~.ram (http://www.tinfoil.com/e09926%7E.ram)

Ripped from an Edison Phonograph cylinder. Requires RealPlayer.

I luuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuv tinfoil.com!