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HawkDJ
05-05-2002, 10:22 PM
Is this a small sign of change, or just a once in a while thing because of decent weather and promotions on a weekend?

Either way the Sox attendance was well above average this weekend.
Saturday: 27,511
Sunday: 27,275

Compared to the last home weekend against Detroit:
Saturday: 15,737
Sunday: 13,619

That is a difference of 25,430. I know Oakland is a much better team than Detroit and the weather was probably better than the Detroit weekend, but to gain 25,430 in a weekend is a step in the right direction at least.

FarWestChicago
05-05-2002, 10:37 PM
The Sox may be attracting some fairweathers now that it's obvious the Flubs are going to be as putrid as usual.

duke of dorwood
05-05-2002, 11:31 PM
:hitless

It's obviously my "boom" commercial

nut_stock
05-05-2002, 11:53 PM
Saturday was a fireworks nite, and sunday was glove day

Procol Harum
05-06-2002, 12:00 AM
I think it was a combo effect: a little further into the year and the chance for good weather--which we actually did get, the promotions, the Sox playing well, and a decent opponent. If the Sox have an ok road trip look for attendance to jump up another 10-15% on the weekend of their homestand against the Angels.

RedPinStripes
05-06-2002, 02:43 AM
Originally posted by FarWestChicago
The Sox may be attracting some fairweathers now that it's obvious the Flubs are going to be as putrid as usual.

:moron
Fluffy and i are on the bandwagon!

MattSharp
05-06-2002, 12:28 PM
I think its a combination of what everyoen said:

Fireworks
Much better weather
Glove Day
Better Team
Fair weather fans

But hey let the fair weather fans come. At least its revenue for our team.......

DrCrawdad
05-06-2002, 07:31 PM
I was at the game on Saturday. Good enthusiastic crowd. People (many the media and/or Cub fans) love to rip the Sox for the promotions. I'm glad the Sox had a nice crowds over the weekend. No doubt the promos played a big part but the Sox are an exciting team so I won't be surprised if they keep drawing well.

- DrCrawdad

BearSox
05-06-2002, 11:28 PM
Where do Cub fans get off ripping our promotions when they have sammy sosa beanie babies and ferris bueller day?

34 Inch Stick
05-07-2002, 10:51 AM
And Barney Day, and Sammy Sosa floating duck day! They have made a career of being cute lovable losers. Even that patch on their old uniforms was made to look like a cute, cuddly bear... unlike the beloved.

Cheryl
05-07-2002, 01:00 PM
Interesting little stat from CNN/SI. I'm assuming they mean either this season or just last week:

10 Ballparks have drawn their lowest-ever crowds for a regularly scheduled game including Pro Player Stadium (4,466), Comerica Park (11,833), SkyDome (12,571) and Miller Park (14,090).

PaleHoseGeorge
05-07-2002, 01:34 PM
Phil Rogers in the Cubune would dispute the optimism regarding the success of Sox April promotions. Today's feature includes a graphic showing Sox attendance through the month essentially flat with last year's, down 0.6 percent.

The Flubs, who have been whining about lousy Chicago weather, reported the second-largest attendance increase in MLB, 25 percent greater than a year ago.

Not to beat a dead horse, but do you suppose the Flubbies' average gate of 31,678 included a fair number of no-shows who bought their tickets through advanced sales? Maybe, just maybe, season ticket/multi-game sales were the driving force behind the increase, not promotions?

Don't shoot the messenger, folks.

:)


:gallas
"<sob>Just wait...<sob> till we get 500 sleepover guests... <sob> next June!"

voodoochile
05-07-2002, 01:54 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
Phil Rogers in the Cubune would dispute the optimism regarding the success of Sox April promotions. Today's feature includes a graphic showing Sox attendance through the month essentially flat with last year's, down 0.6 percent.

The Flubs, who have been whining about lousy Chicago weather, reported the second-largest attendance increase in MLB, 25 percent greater than a year ago.

Not to beat a dead horse, but do you suppose the Flubbies' average gate of 31,678 included a fair number of no-shows who bought their tickets through advanced sales? Maybe, just maybe, season ticket/multi-game sales were the driving force behind the increase, not promotions?

Some of that is just do to optimism entering the season over the acquisition of Alou to a team that barely missed the playoffs last year. Much the way the Sox experienced a large jump in season ticket sales last year after our playoff run.

Not saying Gallas is a great promoter, but you are comparing his work to a team with the largest PR department in the world - The Chicago Tribune - and that team was coming off of a by their standards successful season and off season.

It's harder for the Sox to gain season ticket sales than the flubbies because they are fighting an uphill battle against the powers that be. Arguably Gallas could do a better job, but it is not the only factor in the equation when comparing Wrigley attendance to Sox attendance...

PaleHoseGeorge
05-07-2002, 02:09 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
Some of that is just do to optimism entering the season over the acquisition of Alou to a team that barely missed the playoffs last year. Much the way the Sox experienced a large jump in season ticket sales last year after our playoff run.

Not saying Gallas is a great promoter, but you are comparing his work to a team with the largest PR department in the world - The Chicago Tribune - and that team was coming off of a by their standards successful season and off season.

It's harder for the Sox to gain season ticket sales than the flubbies because they are fighting an uphill battle against the powers that be. Arguably Gallas could do a better job, but it is not the only factor in the equation when comparing Wrigley attendance to Sox attendance...

I don't disagree with any of this. My point was only to illustrate how important advanced ticket sales are compared to promotions. There is NO WAY the Flubs had 30,000 people in the ballpark last month. If they hadn't sold those seats ahead of time, their increase in sales would more closely match the 0.6 percent decline Rob "King of the Walk ups" Gallas achieved with his promotional extravaganza.

hold2dibber
05-07-2002, 04:13 PM
PHG - I don't disagree with anything you've said in this thread (or in previous threads) regarding the desparate need for a greater season ticket sales base. What is not clear to me, however, is what efforts Gallas has made in this respect. Are you basing your criticism strictly on the lousy results, or do you know what he's done (if anything) to try to resolve this problem? Do you have any suggestions as to how to resolve this problem?

PaleHoseGeorge
05-07-2002, 05:06 PM
Originally posted by hold2dibber
....Are you basing your criticism strictly on the lousy results, or do you know what he's done (if anything) to try to resolve this problem? Do you have any suggestions as to how to resolve this problem?

My criticism is based on the actual results (greatly increased walk ups without commensurate season ticket increases) the past three seasons. Furthermore, Gallas is inventing new whacky single-game promotions (like this year's new sleepover night). Clearly the man doesn't get it.

There aren't enough inducements to stimulate season ticket or advanced sales. Here's an idea the Cardinals used to use, and may still, (I haven't been to St. Louis in several years).

The Cardinals offered a pre-season coupon book. They were sold year-round, but were especially popular at Christmas and for general gift-giving and office rewards. The coupons were for $10 each and could be applied against "any future Cardinals game, subject to ticket availability." The coupon booklets themselves were $100 and included eleven $10 coupons. Thus the buyer was receiving a $10 discount.

The Cardinals got all their money upfront, and basically forced recipients to spend their money on tickets. Furthermore, you could buy any AVAILABLE ticket, which meant sellouts weren't affected by previous coupon book sales.

We used to give the coupons as incentives to salespeople and customers. They were very popular, because the recipient could use them however and whenever they wanted.

Naturally, lots of coupons were never used, but the team kept the money. Lots of other coupon users bought additional tickets beyond the $10 discount they were given--adding even more profit to the team's bottom line. Others took the entire booklet and applied it against various season ticket plans the Cards made available.

Naturally, everyone who bought these booklets became prime targets for the sales pitch of the season ticket sales staff. I believe season ticketholders had options on buying coupon booklets at additional discounts, but I'm not sure. This was an especially effective sales tool for getting small businesses to buy season tickets and get extra freebies for their clients and employees.

That's just one small example.

The closest the Sox have to this is Sox Seven--and you must specify all your dates, and receive the specific tickets in kind. I missed four of my dates last year, and vowed never to buy the package again.

Cheryl
05-07-2002, 05:10 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge

The closest the Sox have to this is Sox Seven--and you must specify all your dates, and receive the specific tickets in kind. I missed four of my dates last year, and vowed never to buy the package again.

This is precisely why I don't buy any season ticket plans available: I don't want to be locked in to particular game dates months in advance. I really like the coupon idea for the flexibility.

Procol Harum
05-07-2002, 05:35 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge

The Cardinals offered a pre-season coupon book.

The coupon booklets themselves were $100 and included eleven $10 coupons. Thus the buyer was receiving a $10 discount.

you could buy any AVAILABLE ticket, which meant sellouts weren't affected by previous coupon book sales.


Lots of other coupon users bought additional tickets beyond the $10 discount they were given--adding even more profit to the team's bottom line. Others took the entire booklet and applied it against various season ticket plans the Cards made available.



Swell idea! You're right in saying that the 7-ticket plan is the closest (and most fan-friendly option) for fans with neither the time or money or Sox fan friends and family to deal with the bigger season ticket plans. But, I like you, hate the idea of shelling out hundreds in advance months ahead of time if I'm unsure what my schedule is going to be.