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View Full Version : Obscure Baseball Rule: 7.05(b)


TomBradley72
05-13-2008, 07:53 PM
"Each runner including the batter runner may, without liability to be put out, advance: (b) Three bases, if a fielder deliberately touches a fair ball with his cap, mask or any part of his uniform detached from its proper place on his person. The ball is in play and the batter may advance to home base at his peril."

Has anyone ever seen this called in an actual game?

DumpJerry
05-13-2008, 08:47 PM
Yes. It happened last year. I forgot the team (it was not during a White Sox game) where an infielder threw his glove in the air to knock down a ball headed for the outfield.

KRS1
05-13-2008, 08:53 PM
DJ always talks about how he got busted for knocking down a shot by Ibanez with a glove-toss when he was playing.

voodoochile
05-13-2008, 10:38 PM
I remember a catcher using his mask to corral a loose ball before it got too far away from him, but I don't remember the ump awarding anyone 3 bases as a result. Of course it was a WP situation, not a batted ball.

fquaye149
05-13-2008, 10:51 PM
I believe the rule is in place because before the advent of gloves, players used to use their hats to catch the ball.

Of course, I'm just applying what I know about the rules of 19th century baseball to infer that about this rule. Some of the better history buffs here probably have a better idea

ComiskeyBrewer
05-13-2008, 11:12 PM
So, if a player catches the ball with his hat(let's say it's a showboat move on a popfly), it's an automatic triple? That's nuts. I never knew about that rule.

StillMissOzzie
05-13-2008, 11:17 PM
I believe the rule is in place because before the advent of gloves, players used to use their hats to catch the ball.

Of course, I'm just applying what I know about the rules of 19th century baseball to infer that about this rule. Some of the better history buffs here probably have a better idea

I always assumed that the rule was in place to stop the outfielder from tossing his glove to knock a potential HR out of the sky (note that batter gets 3 bases but not a HR), or to stop a ball from rolling into the corner (when it would probably end up being a triple anyhow)

But I really have no idea...

SMO
:scratch:

TDog
05-14-2008, 12:12 AM
You don't see it much in professional baseball because professionals know better. You see it sometimes in amateur ball, mostly players chasing after balls rolling past them. The rule also prohits players from showboating by catching pop ups with their caps. The rule has been around about as long as players have been using gloves, I believe.

Strangely enough, players into the 1940s, maybe later, players left their gloves on the field when they went in to hit, although there was a potential for people to trip over them or batted balls to hit them.

Nellie_Fox
05-14-2008, 12:44 AM
Strangely enough, players into the 1940s, maybe later, players left their gloves on the field when they went in to hit, although there was a potential for people to trip over them or batted balls to hit them.The rule requiring players to take all their equipment off the field went into effect in 1954. I was too little to remember it, but I've heard many older players say they don't ever remember a player tripping over a glove or the ball hitting one.

TDog
05-14-2008, 01:27 AM
The rule requiring players to take all their equipment off the field went into effect in 1954. I was too little to remember it, but I've heard many older players say they don't ever remember a player tripping over a glove or the ball hitting one.

I thoguht the practice might have gone on into the '50s. I heard an announcer some years ago talking about having played long enough ago that he was in a game that was decided by a line drive that hit a glove in the outfield. Apparently, though, it was extremely rare and unintentional.

At the end of the movie Eight Men Out, Joe Jackson, playing under an assumed name, makes a great catch in the outfield, tosses his glove away and jogs in to come to come to bat and hit a triple. Today an outfielder tosses the ball into the stands and jogs in. Really, I prefer the old school look of tossing away your glove after a catch, but I can't imagine leaving my glove on the field when I'm at bat.

TDog
05-14-2008, 01:50 AM
So, if a player catches the ball with his hat(let's say it's a showboat move on a popfly), it's an automatic triple? That's nuts. I never knew about that d be nuts.

Not a triple, but a three-base error. It's not nuts. You can catch a ball with your hands or your glove. You can't catch it with your uniform. (However, the only penalties for letting a ball bounce off your head or chest before you catch it are pain and embarrassment.) You shouldn't see players catching popups with their caps anyway, even if there wasn't a rule against it.

In fact, a third strike that gets stuck in a catcher's gear is the equivalent of a dropped third strike.

Hokiesox
05-14-2008, 12:27 PM
"Each runner including the batter runner may, without liability to be put out, advance: (b) Three bases, if a fielder deliberately touches a fair ball with his cap, mask or any part of his uniform detached from its proper place on his person. The ball is in play and the batter may advance to home base at his peril."

Has anyone ever seen this called in an actual game?

I've called it in high school games and various little league games. Except for the high school crowd, it's fun to call because the coaches think I'm making it up EVERY TIME. Usually results in an ejection.

D. TODD
05-14-2008, 12:42 PM
You don't see it much in professional baseball because professionals know better. You see it sometimes in amateur ball, mostly players chasing after balls rolling past them. The rule also prohits players from showboating by catching pop ups with their caps. The rule has been around about as long as players have been using gloves, I believe.

Strangely enough, players into the 1940s, maybe later, players left their gloves on the field when they went in to hit, although there was a potential for people to trip over them or batted balls to hit them. I remember this being called a couple of times when I played little league/senior league ball. the outfielder threw his glove as a ball was shooting by him on the ground in the gap. One time it was a guy on our team, he missed the ball, but our coach chewed his ass out and let him no in no uncertain terms that it was a 3 base penalty if he would have had better aim.

I have also seen guys awarded a base for idiots screaming cut from the dugout on a throw home, or even get down to a opponent baserunner forcing him to slide into 3rd when there was no throw coming in.

Taliesinrk
05-14-2008, 02:14 PM
I always assumed that the rule was in place to stop the outfielder from tossing his glove to knock a potential HR out of the sky (note that batter gets 3 bases but not a HR), or to stop a ball from rolling into the corner (when it would probably end up being a triple anyhow)

But I really have no idea...

SMO
:scratch:

Not included here, but also part of the rule is that at the umpire's discretion, he may award 4 bases if he determines that the runner would have been able to score.

Zisk77
05-15-2008, 10:31 AM
I believe its one base extra if you throw your glove at the ball, but miss hitting the ball. Happened to me in little league. I hit a triple and was awarded home when the outfielder threw his glove in an attempt to stop my gap-shot.:redneck