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NardiWasHere
04-23-2008, 08:58 PM
Why don't you ever hear about Haitian baseball/Haitian baseball players?

The Dominican Republic is so big in the MLB, but I don't think I've ever heard of a player coming from the other side of the island of Hispaniola.

Anyone know why?

Oblong
04-23-2008, 09:30 PM
Funny you ask because last week Jay Mohr was subbing for Jim Rome and asked the same question.

NardiWasHere
04-23-2008, 09:35 PM
Funny you ask because last week Jay Mohr was subbing for Jim Rome and asked the same question.

Jay Mohr?? Did he do a good job?

DSpivack
04-23-2008, 09:44 PM
I'd imagine soccer is the big sport there.

Lefty34
04-23-2008, 09:56 PM
Why don't you ever hear about Haitian baseball/Haitian baseball players?

The Dominican Republic is so big in the MLB, but I don't think I've ever heard of a player coming from the other side of the island of Hispaniola.

Anyone know why?

Haiti is one of the poorest countries in the world, with a GDP per-capita of $1,900 and almost 80% of its people living under the poverty line. Moreover, Haiti in 2007-2008 had a Human Development Index of .529, which was good enough for 146th place out of 177.

I think the reason you don't hear of Haitian ballplayers is because with the country in such shambles, the youngsters are too worried about eating once in the upcoming week to be worried about making it to baseball practice, if they are even exposed to the game at all.

FloridaTigers
04-23-2008, 10:41 PM
Haiti was colonized by the French, Dominican Republic by Spanish. Haitians play soccer and cricket. Dominicans, like most Carribean countries at one point colonized by Spain, play baseball. Baseball became a huge hit in spanish speaking countries at the turn of the 20th century, in Mexico, Cuba, and the DR. Haiti, never being under spanish influence, and developing its own culture, never adopted baseball really.

FedEx227
04-23-2008, 10:46 PM
Haiti was colonized by the French, Dominican Republic by Spanish. Haitians play soccer and cricket. Dominicans, like most Carribean countries at one point colonized by Spain, play baseball. Baseball became a huge hit in spanish speaking countries at the turn of the 20th century, in Mexico, Cuba, and the DR. Haiti, never being under spanish influence, and developing its own culture, never adopted baseball really.

There are only a few NBA players even from Haitil the only ones I could find by quick glance were Olden Polynice (man traded for Pippen) and the Sixers current center Samuel Dalembert.

NardiWasHere
04-24-2008, 12:12 AM
Haiti is one of the poorest countries in the world, with a GDP per-capita of $1,900 and almost 80% of its people living under the poverty line. Moreover, Haiti in 2007-2008 had a Human Development Index of .529, which was good enough for 146th place out of 177.

I think the reason you don't hear of Haitian ballplayers is because with the country in such shambles, the youngsters are too worried about eating once in the upcoming week to be worried about making it to baseball practice, if they are even exposed to the game at all.

Nicaragua is 128th in Per-Capita GDP, yet Vicente Padilla was born there...

The whole poverty argument doesn't necessarily do it for me. Sports are a form of escape that all cultures (no matter how rich or poor) partake in. Obviously golf is not going to be played in an impoverished nation... However, baseball is a relatively cheap and simple game to play.

I understand that a poor/developing nation will have less leisure time... Yet, there are still sports played in these countries.


Haiti was colonized by the French, Dominican Republic by Spanish. Haitians play soccer and cricket. Dominicans, like most Carribean countries at one point colonized by Spain, play baseball. Baseball became a huge hit in spanish speaking countries at the turn of the 20th century, in Mexico, Cuba, and the DR. Haiti, never being under spanish influence, and developing its own culture, never adopted baseball really.


I thought it might have had to do with the French influence...

However, its strange that two countries exist on one fairly small island and there wouldn't be enough mixing of culture to spread baseball. The Haitian revolution occurred around 1800. Even though the culture has a lasting French influence, I would think the popularity of baseball would spill across the state lines... Ya know?

Dunno... Its still strange to me... Especially since I imagine there are a bunch of Americans in Haiti doing charitable work, therefore exposing American culture to the country as well.

DumpJerry
04-24-2008, 12:28 AM
Scott Borass has been consistently denied an entry visa to the country.

I want Mags back
04-24-2008, 02:18 AM
Haiti was colonized by the French, Dominican Republic by Spanish. Haitians play soccer and cricket. Dominicans, like most Carribean countries at one point colonized by Spain, play baseball. Baseball became a huge hit in spanish speaking countries at the turn of the 20th century, in Mexico, Cuba, and the DR. Haiti, never being under spanish influence, and developing its own culture, never adopted baseball really.
i like this answer

TheVulture
04-24-2008, 09:45 AM
Haiti, never being under spanish influence, and developing its own culture, never adopted baseball really.

What about when it was colonized by the US?

WSox597
04-24-2008, 10:28 AM
Scott Borass has been consistently denied an entry visa to the country.

May not be accurate, but the best answer in the thread. :D:

I vote for the soccer idea. Soccer also requires less equipment to buy, so it works for the poverty angle too.

I mean, a ball, a prairie, and you're good to go.

Lefty34
04-24-2008, 06:16 PM
You also have to look at the development of the people in that country, and the chances they have to a) pick up a recreational sport, b) be extremely talented at it and c) get noticed by someone not affiliated with the IMF or World Bank.

In Haiti, 80% of the people live below the poverty line and 54% of the people live in abject poverty (less than $1 USD per day). Most of the children in Haiti are malnourished or are barely getting by, and that might go a long way in explaining why there are very few Haitians that are able to play any sport at a very high competitive level (say, professional baseball), again, if they are exposed to the game at all.

This is to say nothing of the political turmoil going on in Haiti, as well.

DSpivack
04-24-2008, 07:50 PM
You also have to look at the development of the people in that country, and the chances they have to a) pick up a recreational sport, b) be extremely talented at it and c) get noticed by someone not affiliated with the IMF or World Bank.

In Haiti, 80% of the people live below the poverty line and 54% of the people live in abject poverty (less than $1 USD per day). Most of the children in Haiti are malnourished or are barely getting by, and that might go a long way in explaining why there are very few Haitians that are able to play any sport at a very high competitive level (say, professional baseball), again, if they are exposed to the game at all.

This is to say nothing of the political turmoil going on in Haiti, as well.

Haiti is much, much worse off than pretty much any other country in the western hemisphere. Sure, there are other poor countries in the Caribbean and in Central America, but the difference even between those is quite astounding.

Lefty34
04-25-2008, 01:56 AM
Haiti is much, much worse off than pretty much any other country in the western hemisphere. Sure, there are other poor countries in the Caribbean and in Central America, but the difference even between those is quite astounding.

Actually I was wrong, I checked at both the IMF and World Bank websites and it is indeed true that all you need in Haiti to be the next Vicente Padilla.

Wow thank God I actually checked the sports page out at IMF.org, I would have kept going on with GDP per capita, and HDI index, and infant mortality rate and all this other garbage. Jeez who knew all you needed was a bat and a glove and a ball?

SOXPHILE
04-25-2008, 11:44 AM
Haiti was colonized by the French, Dominican Republic by Spanish. Haitians play soccer and cricket. Dominicans, like most Carribean countries at one point colonized by Spain, play baseball. Baseball became a huge hit in spanish speaking countries at the turn of the 20th century, in Mexico, Cuba, and the DR. Haiti, never being under spanish influence, and developing its own culture, never adopted baseball really.

I also think it might have had something to do with years ago, American oil workers living there introducing baseball to the locals, and it caught on.

bigsoxfan420
04-25-2008, 11:52 AM
You can play soccer with probably just about anything made into a ball. where as baseball you need all the equipment. Being one of the poorest countries on earth the former is much more likely.

doublem23
04-25-2008, 12:08 PM
Actually I was wrong, I checked at both the IMF and World Bank websites and it is indeed true that all you need in Haiti to be the next Vicente Padilla.

Wow thank God I actually checked the sports page out at IMF.org, I would have kept going on with GDP per capita, and HDI index, and infant mortality rate and all this other garbage. Jeez who knew all you needed was a bat and a glove and a ball?


Oh, don't take it so personally. You make it sound like all the fat cats in the Dominican Republic are sitting around, sipping their drinks out of gold chalices while they sit around on their piles of money.

:rolleyes:

There's poverty all over Latin America, yet other nations seem to be able to produce baseball players. Didn't Miguel Tejada weigh something like 110 pounds when he was first discovered by the Athletics? I'm not discounting Haiti has some problems, but there are other factors (like, lack of exposure to the sport), that contribute just as much to their lack of baseball talent as abject poverty.

spiffie
04-25-2008, 12:16 PM
I would guess a lot of it also has to do with the generally unsettled state of affairs there politically. The environment isn't conducive to sending people down there to start acadamies and watch youngsters over long periods. Not only is Haiti poor, but it hasn't had a very stable political situation in a long time.